Prompt vs Motive - What's the difference?

prompt | motive |


As adjectives the difference between prompt and motive

is that prompt is (archaic) ready, willing (to act) while motive is causing motion; having power to move, or tending to move; as, a motive argument; motive power.

As nouns the difference between prompt and motive

is that prompt is a reminder or cue while motive is an incentive to act; a reason for doing something; anything that prompted a choice of action.

As verbs the difference between prompt and motive

is that prompt is to lead someone toward what they should say or do while motive is to prompt or incite by a motive or motives; to move.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

prompt

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • (archaic) Ready, willing (to act).
  • * 1623 , William Shakespeare, Antony & Cleopatra , III.8:
  • Tell him, I am prompt To lay my Crowne at's feete, and there to kneele.
  • Quick, acting without delay.
  • He was very prompt at getting a new job.
  • On time, punctual.
  • Be prompt for your appointment.

    Derived terms

    * promptness

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A reminder or cue.
  • (business, dated) A time limit given for payment of an account for produce purchased, this limit varying with different goods.
  • * John Stuart Mill
  • To cover any probable difference of price which might arise before the expiration of the prompt , which for this article [tea] is three months.
  • (computing) A symbol that appears on a monitor to indicate that the computer is ready to receive input.
  • I filled in my name where the prompt appeared on the computer screen but my account wasn't recognized.
  • (writing) A suggestion for inspiration given to an author.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To lead someone toward what they should say or do.
  • I prompted him to get a new job.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=September 2 , author=Phil McNulty , title=Bulgaria 0-3 England , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=The only sour note on a virtually perfect night for England came from shameful 'monkey' chanting aimed at Ashley Cole and Ashley Young from a section of Bulgaria's fans which later prompted an official complaint from the Football Association to Uefa.}}
  • (theater, and, television) - to show or tell an actor/person the words they should be saying, or actions they should be doing.
  • If he forgets his words I will prompt him.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    See also

    * promptly * prompter ----

    motive

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) An idea or communication that makes one want to act, especially from spiritual sources; a divine prompting.
  • *, III.2.1.ii:
  • *:there's something in a woman beyond all human delight; a magnetic virtue, a charming quality, an occult and powerful motive .
  • An incentive to act in a particular way; a reason or emotion that makes one want to do something; anything that prompts a choice of action.
  • * 1947 , (Malcolm Lowry), Under the Volcano :
  • Many of them at first seemed kind to him, but it turned out their motives were not entirely altruistic.
  • (obsolete, rare) A limb or other bodily organ that can move.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (legal) Something which causes someone to want to commit a crime; a reason for criminal behaviour.
  • What would his motive be for burning down the cottage?
    No-one could understand why she had hidden the shovel; her motives were obscure at best.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1931, author=
  • , chapter=10/6, title= Death Walks in Eastrepps , passage=“Why should Eldridge commit murder?
  • (architecture, fine arts) A motif.
  • (music) A motif; a theme or subject, especially one that is central to the work or often repeated.
  • If you listen carefully, you can hear the flutes mimicking the cello motive .

    Synonyms

    * (incentive ) motivation * (creative works ) motif

    Verb

  • To prompt or incite by a motive or motives; to move.
  • Synonyms

    * motivate

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Causing motion; having power to move, or tending to move; as, a motive argument; motive power.
  • * 1658 , Sir Thomas Browne, The Garden of Cyrus , Folio Society 2007, p. 195:
  • In the motive parts of animals may be discovered mutuall proportions; not only in those of Quadrupeds, but in the thigh-bone, legge, foot-bone, and claws of Birds.
  • Relating to motion and/or to its cause
  • Synonyms

    * moving * (relating to motion) motional

    Anagrams

    * ----