Proceed vs Prolong - What's the difference?

proceed | prolong |


As verbs the difference between proceed and prolong

is that proceed is to move, pass, or go forward or onward; to advance; to continue or renew motion begun while prolong is (label) to extend in space or length.

proceed

English

(Webster 1913)

Verb

(en verb)
  • To move, pass, or go forward or onward; to advance; to continue or renew motion begun.
  • to proceed on a journey.
  • To pass from one point, topic, or stage, to another.
  • To proceed with a story or argument.
  • To issue or come forth as from a source or origin; to come from.
  • Light proceeds from the sun.
  • To go on in an orderly or regulated manner; to begin and carry on a series of acts or measures; to act by method; to prosecute a design.
  • * John Locke
  • he that proceeds upon other Principles in his Enquiry
  • To be transacted; to take place; to occur.
  • * Shakespeare
  • He will, after his sour fashion, tell you / What hath proceeded worthy note to-day.
  • To have application or effect; to operate.
  • * Ayliffe
  • This rule only proceeds and takes place when a person can not of common law condemn another by his sentence.
  • To begin and carry on a legal process. (rfex)
  • Usage notes

    * This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive . See * Not to be confused with precede. * Many of the other English verbs ultimately derived from Latin are spelled ending in "cede", so the misspelling "procede" is common.

    Synonyms

    * progress

    Antonyms

    * regress * recede

    References

    * *

    See also

    * proceeds (noun)

    prolong

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (label) To extend in space or length.
  • (label) To lengthen in time; to extend the duration of; to draw out; to continue.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers)
  • , chapter=5, title= A Cuckoo in the Nest , passage=The departure was not unduly prolonged . In the road Mr. Love and the driver favoured the company with a brief chanty running. “Got it?—No, I ain't, 'old on,—Got it? Got it?—No, 'old on sir.”}}
  • (label) To lengthen temporally; to put off to a distant time; to postpone.
  • Derived terms

    * prolongable * prolongation * prolonger * prolongment

    References

    * *