Target vs Program - What's the difference?

target | program |


As nouns the difference between target and program

is that target is a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile while program is program, programme.

As a verb target

is to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).

target

English

(wikipedia target)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.
  • A goal or objective.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=70, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Engineers of a different kind , passage=Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers.
  • A kind of small shield or buckler, used as a defensive weapon in war.
  • * 1598 , William Shakespeare, Henry IV , Part I, Act II, Scene IV, line 200,
  • These four came all afront, and mainly thrust at me. I made me no more ado but took all their seven points in my target , thus.
  • (obsolete) A shield resembling the Roman scutum. In modern usage, a smaller variety of shield is usually implied by this term.
  • * 1786 , Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons , page 22,
  • The target or buckler was carried by the heavy armed foot, it answered to the scutum of the Romans; its form was sometimes that of a rectangular parallelogram, but more commonly had its bottom rounded off; it was generally convex, being curved in its breadth.
  • (sports) The pattern or arrangement of a series of hits made by a marksman on a butt or mark.
  • (surveying) The sliding crosspiece, or vane, on a leveling staff.
  • (rail transport) A conspicuous disk attached to a switch lever to show its position, or for use as a signal.
  • (cricket) the number of runs that the side batting last needs to score in the final innings in order to win
  • (linguistics) The tenor of a metaphor.
  • (translation studies) The translated version of a document, or the language into which translation occurs.
  • A person (or group of people) that a person or organization is trying to employ or to have as a customer, audience etc.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 2, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC
  • , title= Bulgaria 0-3 England , passage=Gary Cahill, a target for Arsenal and Tottenham before the transfer window closed, put England ahead early on and Rooney was on target twice before the interval as the early hostility of the Bulgarian supporters was swiftly subdued.}}

    Derived terms

    * targeter * targeting

    Synonyms

    * See also * (translated version) target language

    Coordinate terms

    * (translated version) source

    Verb

  • To aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).
  • (figuratively) To aim for as an audience or demographic.
  • The advertising campaign targeted older women.
  • (computing) To produce code suitable for.
  • This cross-platform compiler can target any of several processors.

    See also

    *

    program

    English

    Alternative forms

    * programme (see usage notes)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A set of structured activities.
  • :
  • A leaflet listing information about a play, game or other activity.
  • :
  • A performance of a show or other broadcast on radio or television.
  • :
  • (lb) A software application, or a collection of software applications, designed to perform a specific task.
  • :
  • A particular mindset or method of doing things.
  • *Ellis in the movie Die Hard
  • *:Come on, John, why don’t you get with the program and tell him where the detonators are?
  • Usage notes

    * Usage of program'' and ''programme : ** US: program is the only spelling normally used. ** UK: programme'' is used in all cases except for computer code, in which case ''program'' is generally used. Older sources may use ''programme for computer code. ** Canada: both program'' and ''programme'' are used, but ''programme is more common. ** Australia: program'' is endorsed by the Australian government, but ''programme is most common. ** New Zealand: programme'' is favoured by New Zealand dictionaries, and is endorsed by government usage; ''program is rarely seen outside the computing meaning.

    Synonyms

    * (leaflet): playbill (for a play ) * (software application): application

    Derived terms

    * programme block * program counter * program evaluation and review technique * program guide * program music * program slicer * program trading

    Verb

    (programm)
  • To enter a program or other instructions into (a computer or other electronic device) to instruct it to do a particular task.
  • * He programmed the DVR to record his favorite show.
  • To develop (software) by writing program code.
  • I programmed a small game as a demonstration.
  • To put together the schedule of an event.
  • * Mary will program Tuesday’s festivities.
  • To cause to automatically behave in a particular way.
  • * The lab rat was programmed to press the lever when the bell rang.