Loquacious vs Profuse - What's the difference?

loquacious | profuse |


As adjectives the difference between loquacious and profuse

is that loquacious is talkative or chatty, especially of persons given to excess conversation while profuse is in great quantity or abundance.

As a verb profuse is

(obsolete) to pour out; to give or spend liberally; to lavish; to squander.

loquacious

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Talkative or chatty, especially of persons given to excess conversation.
  • * 1841 , , ch. 8:
  • On the other hand, Hetty was moody and silent. She was never loquacious , or if she occasionally became communicative, it was under the influence of some temporary excitement that served to arouse her unsophisticated mind; but, for hours at a time, in the course of this all-important day, she seemed to have absolutely lost the use of her tongue.

    Synonyms

    * chatty, talkative, garrulous * See also

    Antonyms

    * laconic, quiet, reserved, taciturn

    Derived terms

    * loquaciously * loquaciousness

    profuse

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • In great quantity or abundance.
  • She grew profuse amounts of zucchini and pumpkins.
    profuse''' hospitality; '''profuse''' apologies; '''profuse expenditure
  • * Milton
  • a green, shady bank, profuse of flowers

    Verb

    (profus)
  • (obsolete) To pour out; to give or spend liberally; to lavish; to squander.
  • (Chapman)
    ----