Inordinate vs Profound - What's the difference?

inordinate | profound |


As adjectives the difference between inordinate and profound

is that inordinate is excessive; unreasonable or inappropriate in magnitude; extreme while profound is descending far below the surface; opening or reaching to great depth; deep.

As a noun profound is

(obsolete) the deep; the sea; the ocean.

As a verb profound is

(obsolete) to cause to sink deeply; to cause to dive or penetrate far down.

inordinate

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Excessive; unreasonable or inappropriate in magnitude; extreme.
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    profound

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Descending far below the surface; opening or reaching to great depth; deep.
  • * (rfdate),
  • A gulf profound
  • Very deep; very serious
  • Intellectually deep; entering far into subjects; reaching to the bottom of a matter, or of a branch of learning; thorough; as, a profound investigation or treatise; a profound scholar; profound wisdom.
  • *
  • Characterized by intensity; deeply felt; pervading; overmastering; far-reaching; strongly impressed; as, a profound sleep.
  • * (rfdate),
  • Profound sciatica
  • * (rfdate),
  • Of the profound corruption of this class there can be no doubt.
  • Bending low, exhibiting or expressing deep humility; lowly; submissive; as, a profound bow.
  • * (rfdate)
  • What humble gestures! What profound reverence!

    Noun

    (-)
  • (obsolete) The deep; the sea; the ocean.
  • God in the fathomless profound / Hath all this choice commanders drowned. Sandys .
  • (obsolete) An abyss.
  • (Milton)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To cause to sink deeply; to cause to dive or penetrate far down.
  • (Sir Thomas Browne)
  • (obsolete) To dive deeply; to penetrate.