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Tore vs Prise - What's the difference?

tore | prise |

As a noun tore

is custom, law.

As a verb prise is

.

As an adjective prise is

priced.

tore

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), (m), (m), from (etyl) . More at (l).

Alternative forms

* (l)

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • (dialectal, or, obsolete) Hard, difficult; wearisome, tedious.
  • (dialectal, or, obsolete) Strong, sturdy; great, massive.
  • (dialectal, or, obsolete) Full; rich.
  • Derived terms
    * (l)

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    (head)
  • (tear) (rip, rend, speed).
  • Usage notes
    * The past tense of the other verb (tear), meaning "produce liquid from the eyes", is (teared).

    Etymology 3

    See torus.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (architecture)
  • (geometry) The surface described by the circumference of a circle revolving about a straight line in its own plane.
  • The solid enclosed by such a surface; an anchor ring.
  • Etymology 4

    Probably from the root of tear; compare Welsh word for a break or cut.

    Noun

    (-)
  • The dead grass that remains on mowing land in winter and spring.
  • (Mortimer)
    (Webster 1913)

    prise

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (verb) prize

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) An enterprise.
  • (Spenser)
  • See also

    * price

    Verb

    (pris)
  • To force (open) with a lever; to pry.
  • 1919: I think he must have been trying to prise open that box yonder when he was attacked. — , The Quest of the Sacred Slipper
    c. 1925: Come, force the gates with crowbars, prise them apart! — Jack Lindsay, translation of Lysistrata
    2004: Most people used pliers, scissors, rubber gloves and knives to try to prise open products. — BBC News

    Anagrams

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