Prank vs Prink - What's the difference?

prank | prink |


As nouns the difference between prank and prink

is that prank is (obsolete) an evil deed; a malicious trick, an act of cruel deception while prink is the act of adjusting dress or appearance; a sprucing up.

As verbs the difference between prank and prink

is that prank is to adorn in a showy manner; to dress or equip ostentatiously while prink is (obsolete|or|dialectal) to give a wink; to wink or prink can be to look, gaze.

As an adjective prank

is (obsolete) full of gambols or tricks.

prank

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (obsolete) An evil deed; a malicious trick, an act of cruel deception.
  • *, II.4.2.ii:
  • Hercules, after all his mad pranks upon his wife and children, was perfectly cured by a purge of hellebor, which an Antieyrian administered unto him.
  • A practical joke or mischievous trick.
  • * Shakespeare
  • His pranks have been too broad to bear with.
  • * Sir Walter Raleigh
  • The harpies played their accustomed pranks .
    Pranks may be funny, but remember that some people are aggressive.
    He pulled a gruesome prank on his sister.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * prankish * pranksome * prankster

    Verb

  • To adorn in a showy manner; to dress or equip ostentatiously.
  • * Spenser
  • In sumptuous tire she joyed herself to prank .
  • * 1748 , , B:II
  • And there a Sea?on atween June and May,
    Half prankt with Spring, with Summer half imbrown'd,
    A li?tle?s Climate made, where, Sooth to ?ay,
    No living Wight could work, ne cared even for Play.
  • * 1880 , For Spring, by Sandro Botticelli , lines 2–3
  • ''Flora, wanton-eyed
    ''For birth, and with all flowrets prankt and pied:
  • To make ostentatious show.
  • * M. Arnold
  • White houses prank where once were huts.
  • To perform a practical joke on; to trick.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2007, date=May 13, author=Karen Crouse, title=Still Invitation Only, but Jets Widen Door for Camp, work=New York Times citation
  • , passage=“If someone’s pranking me,” Rowlands remembered thinking, “they’re going to great lengths to make it work.” }}
  • (slang) To call someone's phone and promptly hang up
  • Hey man, prank me when you wanna get picked up.
    I don't have your number in my phone, can you prank me?

    Synonyms

    (call and promptly hang up) missed call, missed-call

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Full of gambols or tricks.
  • (Webster 1913) English transitive verbs

    prink

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . More at .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete, or, dialectal) to give a wink; to wink.
  • Etymology 2

    Perhaps alteration (due to primp) of , (etyl) and (etyl) prunk.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • the act of adjusting dress or appearance; a sprucing up
  • * 2006 , Louisa May Alcott, Little Women :
  • [...] And does my hair look very bad?", said Meg, as she turned from the glass in Mrs. Gardiner's dressing room after a prolonged prink .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to look, gaze
  • to dress finely, primp, preen, spruce up
  • to strut, put on pompous airs, be pretentious
  • Synonyms
    * (l)