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Redress vs Prevent - What's the difference?

redress | prevent |

In obsolete|transitive|lang=en terms the difference between redress and prevent

is that redress is (obsolete|transitive) to put upright again; to restore while prevent is (obsolete|transitive) to be beforehand with; to anticipate.

As verbs the difference between redress and prevent

is that redress is to put in order again; to set right; to emend; to revise or redress can be to dress again while prevent is to stop; to keep (from happening).

As a noun redress

is the act of redressing; a making right; reformation; correction; amendment or redress can be the redecoration of a previously existing film set so that it can double for another set.

redress

Etymology 1

From (etyl) redrecier and (etyl) redresser, from (re-) + .

Verb

(es)
  • To put in order again; to set right; to emend; to revise.
  • * Milton
  • In yonder spring of roses intermixed / With myrtle, find what to redress till noon.
  • * A. Hamilton
  • your wish that I should redress a certain paper which you had prepared
  • To set right, as a wrong; to repair, as an injury; to make amends for; to remedy; to relieve from.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Those wrongs, those bitter injuries, / I doubt not but with honour to redress .
  • To make amends or compensation to; to relieve of anything unjust or oppressive; to bestow relief upon.
  • * Dryden
  • 'Tis thine, O king! the afflicted to redress .
  • * Byron
  • Will Gaul or Muscovite redress ye?
  • (obsolete) To put upright again; to restore.
  • * 1485 , Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur , Book X:
  • ‘Well,’ sayde Sir Palomydes, ‘than shall ye se how we shall redresse oure myghtes!’
    Derived terms
    * self-redress

    Noun

    (redresses)
  • The act of redressing; a making right; reformation; correction; amendment.
  • A setting right, as of wrong, injury, or oppression; as, the redress of grievances; hence, relief; remedy; reparation; indemnification.
  • One who, or that which, gives relief; a redresser.
  • Etymology 2

    .

    Verb

    (es)
  • To dress again.
  • * 1963 , Albert J. Solnit, ?Milton J. E. Senn, ?Sally Provence, Modern perspectives in child development (page 588)
  • The teacher first undressed and redressed the doll for the child, then showed her how to pull the snaps apart. No other activity interested the little girl, and after repeated demonstrations she was still trying unsuccessfully to undress the doll.
  • To redecorate a previously existing film set so that it can double for another set.
  • Noun

    (redresses)
  • The redecoration of a previously existing film set so that it can double for another set.
  • This is a redress of the office set.

    Anagrams

    * English heteronyms

    prevent

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (archaic)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To stop; to keep (from happening).
  • I brushed my teeth to prevent them from going yellow.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=October 1 , author=Tom Fordyce , title=Rugby World Cup 2011: England 16-12 Scotland , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Scotland must now hope Georgia produce a huge upset and beat Argentina by at least eight points in Sunday's final Pool B match to prevent them failing to make the last eight for the first time in World Cup history.}}
  • * 1897 , Henry James, What Maisie Knew :
  • ‘I think you must be mad, and she shall not have a glimpse of it while I'm here to prevent !’
  • (obsolete) To come before; to precede.
  • * Bible, 1 Thess. iv. 15
  • We which are alive and remain unto the coming of the Lord shall not prevent them which are asleep.
  • * Book of Common Prayer
  • We pray thee that thy grace may always prevent and follow us.
  • * Prior
  • Then had I come, preventing Sheba's queen.
  • (obsolete) To outdo, surpass.
  • * 1596 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , IV.i:
  • With that he put his spurres vnto his steed, / With speare in rest, and toward him did fare, / Like shaft out of a bow preuenting speed.
  • (obsolete) To be beforehand with; to anticipate.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • their ready guilt preventing thy commands

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * preventative * prevention * preventive