What is the difference between presiding and judge?

presiding | judge |


As verbs the difference between presiding and judge

is that presiding is (preside) while judge is to sit in judgment on; to pass sentence on.

As a adjective presiding

is having authority over; vested with the authority to preside over.

As a noun judge is

(senseid)a public official whose duty it is to administer the law, especially by presiding over trials and rendering judgments; a justice.

presiding

English

Verb

(head)
  • Adjective

    (-)
  • Having authority over; vested with the authority to preside over.
  • Anagrams

    *

    judge

    English

    Alternative forms

    * judg (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (senseid)A public official whose duty it is to administer the law, especially by presiding over trials and rendering judgments; a justice.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • The parts of a judge in hearing are four: to direct the evidence; to moderate length, repetition, or impertinency of speech; to recapitulate, select, and collate the material points of that which hath been said; and to give the rule or sentence.
  • A person who decides the fate of someone or something that has been called into question.
  • A person officiating at a sports or similar event.
  • At a boxing match the decision of the judges is final.
  • A person whose opinion on a subject is respected.
  • He is a good judge of wine.
  • * Dryden
  • A man who is no judge' of law may be a good ' judge of poetry, or eloquence, or of the merits of a painting.

    Synonyms

    * (one who judges or dispenses judgement) deemer, deemster * (official of the court) justice, sheriff

    Derived terms

    * * * * * *

    Verb

    (judg)
  • To sit in judgment on; to pass sentence on.
  • A higher power will judge you after you are dead.
  • To sit in judgment, to act as judge.
  • Justices in this country judge without appeal.
  • To form an opinion on.
  • I judge a man’s character by the cut of his suit.
  • To arbitrate; to pass opinion on something, especially to settle a dispute etc.
  • We cannot both be right: you must judge between us.
  • To have as an opinion; to consider, suppose.
  • I judge it safe to leave the house once again.
  • To form an opinion; to infer.
  • I judge from the sky that it might rain later.
  • * 1884 : (Mark Twain), (The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn), Chapter VIII
  • THE sun was up so high when I waked that I judged it was after eight o'clock.
  • (intransitive) To criticize or label another person or thing.
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * * *