Presage vs Insinuate - What's the difference?

presage | insinuate |


As verbs the difference between presage and insinuate

is that presage is to predict or foretell something while insinuate is (rare) to creep, wind, or flow into; to enter gently, slowly, or imperceptibly, as into crevices.

As a noun presage

is a warning of a future event; an omen.

presage

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A warning of a future event; an omen.
  • An intuition of a future event; a presentiment.
  • Verb

    (presag)
  • To predict or foretell something.
  • * Shakespeare
  • My dreams presage some joyful news at hand.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=November 7, author=Matt Bai, title=Winning a Second Term, Obama Will Confront Familiar Headwinds, work=New York Times citation
  • , passage=That brief moment after the election four years ago, when many Americans thought Mr. Obama‚Äôs election would presage a new, less fractious political era, now seems very much a thing of the past. }}
  • To make a prediction.
  • To have a presentiment of; to feel beforehand; to foreknow.
  • Synonyms

    * foreshadow * portend

    insinuate

    English

    Verb

  • (rare) To creep, wind, or flow into; to enter gently, slowly, or imperceptibly, as into crevices.
  • * Woodward
  • The water easily insinuates itself into, and placidly distends, the vessels of vegetables.
  • (figurative, by extension) To ingratiate; to obtain access to or introduce something by subtle, cunning or artful means.
  • * 1995 , , p. 242
  • Nanny didn't so much enter places as insinuate herself; she had unconsciously taken a natural talent for liking people and developed it into an occult science.
  • * John Locke
  • All the art of rhetoric, besides order and clearness, are for nothing else but to insinuate wrong ideas, move the passions, and thereby mislead the judgment.
  • * Dryden
  • Horace laughs to shame all follies and insinuates virtue, rather by familiar examples than by the severity of precepts.
  • * Clarendon
  • He insinuated himself into the very good grace of the Duke of Buckingham.
  • To hint; to suggest tacitly while avoiding a direct statement.
  • She insinuated that her friends had betrayed her.

    Synonyms

    * (Make a way for or introduce something by subtle, crafty or artful means. ): imply

    Anagrams

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