Preposition vs Preposed - What's the difference?

preposition | preposed | Related terms |

Preposition is a related term of preposed.


In context|grammar|lang=en terms the difference between preposition and preposed

is that preposition is (grammar) any of a closed class of non-inflecting words typically employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival]] or [[adverb|adverbial sense, with some other word: a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in english always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word while preposed is (grammar) placed before another term in a phrase.

As a noun preposition

is (grammar) any of a closed class of non-inflecting words typically employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival]] or [[adverb|adverbial sense, with some other word: a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in english always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word.

As a verb preposition

is to place in a location before some other event occurs.

As a adjective preposed is

(grammar) placed before another term in a phrase.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

preposition

Etymology 1

From (etyl) praepositio'', from ''praeponere'' (to place before); ''prae'' (before) + ''ponere'' (to put, place); compare French ''''. (See position, and compare provost.) So called because it is usually placed before the word with which it is phrased, as in .

Alternative forms

* (archaic)

Noun

(en noun)
  • (grammar) Any of a closed class of non-inflecting words typically employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival]] or [[adverb, adverbial sense, with some other word: a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word.
  • *
  • And in (121) below, we see that when a wh-NP is used as the Object of a Preposition , the whole Prepositional Phrase can undergo WH MOVEMENT:
    (121) (a)      [To whom''] can I send this letter —?
    (121) (b)      [''About what''] are they quarrelling —?
    (121) (c)      [''In which book
    ] did you read about it —?
  • (obsolete) A proposition; an exposition; a discourse.
  • * (rfdate),
  • He made a long preposition and oration.
    Hypernyms
    * adposition
    Coordinate terms
    * circumposition * postposition
    Derived terms
    * preposition of time * preposition of place * prepositional * prepositionally * prepositional phrase

    See also

    * preverb

    Etymology 2

    From pre- + position

    Alternative forms

    * pre-position

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To place in a location before some other event occurs.
  • It is important to preposition the material before turning on the machine.
    English heteronyms ----

    preposed

    English

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (grammar) Placed before another term in a phrase.
  • Antonyms

    * postposed