Residence vs Premise - What's the difference?

residence | premise |


As nouns the difference between residence and premise

is that residence is residence (place where one resides) while premise is a proposition antecedently supposed or proved; something previously stated or assumed as the basis of further argument; a condition; a supposition.

As a verb premise is

to state or assume something as a proposition to an argument.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

residence

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The place where one lives.
  • * Macaulay
  • Johnson took up his residence in London.
  • A building used as a home.
  • The place where a corporation is established.
  • The state of living in a particular place or environment.
  • * Sir M. Hale
  • The confessor had often made considerable residences in Normandy.
  • The place where anything rests permanently.
  • * Milton
  • But when a king sets himself to bandy against the highest court and residence of all his regal power, he then fights against his own majesty and kingship.
  • subsidence, as of a sediment
  • (Francis Bacon)
  • That which falls to the bottom of liquors; sediment; also, refuse; residuum.
  • (Jeremy Taylor)

    premise

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (archaic), premiss

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A proposition antecedently supposed or proved; something previously stated or assumed as the basis of further argument; a condition; a supposition.
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • The premises observed, / Thy will by my performance shall be served.
  • (logic) Any of the first propositions of a syllogism, from which the conclusion is deduced.
  • * Dr. H. More
  • While the premises stand firm, it is impossible to shake the conclusion.
  • (usually, in the plural, legal) Matters previously stated or set forth; especially, that part in the beginning of a deed, the office of which is to express the grantor and grantee, and the land or thing granted or conveyed, and all that precedes the habendum; the thing demised or granted.
  • (usually, in the plural) A piece of real estate; a building and its adjuncts (in this sense, used most often in the plural form).
  • * , chapter=19
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Nothing was too small to receive attention, if a supervising eye could suggest improvements likely to conduce to the common welfare. Mr. Gordon Burnage, for instance, personally visited dust-bins and back premises , accompanied by a sort of village bailiff, going his round like a commanding officer doing billets.}}

    Coordinate terms

    * conclusion

    Derived terms

    * major premise * minor premise

    Verb

    (premis)
  • To state or assume something as a proposition to an argument.
  • To make a premise.
  • To set forth beforehand, or as introductory to the main subject; to offer previously, as something to explain or aid in understanding what follows.
  • * Addison
  • I premise these particulars that the reader may know that I enter upon it as a very ungrateful task.
  • To send before the time, or beforehand; hence, to cause to be before something else; to employ previously.
  • * Shakespeare
  • the premised flames of the last day
  • * E. Darwin
  • if venesection and a cathartic be premised

    References

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    Anagrams

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