Discriminating vs Prejudice - What's the difference?

discriminating | prejudice |


As an adjective discriminating

is able to perceive fine distinctions between similar things; perceptive.

As a verb discriminating

is .

As a noun prejudice is

a harm, a damage.

discriminating

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Able to perceive fine distinctions between similar things; perceptive
  • Having a discerning judgment or taste
  • Verb

    (head)
  • prejudice

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (archaic)

    Noun

  • (countable) An adverse judgment or opinion formed beforehand or without knowledge of the facts.
  • * (rfdate) (Macaulay)
  • Though often misled by prejudice and passion, he was emphatically an honest man.
  • (countable) Any preconceived opinion or feeling, whether positive or negative.
  • (countable) An irrational hostile attitude, fear or hatred towards a particular group, race or religion.
  • I am free of all prejudices . I hate everyone equally.
  • (obsolete) Knowledge formed in advance; foresight, presaging.
  • * , II.ix:
  • the first did in the forepart sit, / That nought mote hinder his quicke preiudize : / He had a sharpe foresight, and working wit
  • (obsolete) Mischief; hurt; damage; injury; detriment.
  • (Locke)
  • * (rfdate) (Shakespeare)
  • England and France might, through their amity, / Breed him some prejudice .

    Derived terms

    * (law) without prejudice – without affecting a legal interest * in prejudice of – to the detriment or injury of * to the prejudice of – with resulting harm to

    Verb

    (prejudic)
  • To have a negative impact on someone's position, chances etc.
  • To cause prejudice.
  • See also

    * stereotype * bias * discrimination * racism English transitive verbs ----