Proface vs Preface - What's the difference?

proface | preface |


As an interjection proface

is (obsolete) much good may it do you! — a familiar salutation or welcome.

As a noun preface is

the part of the liturgy that precedes the main part of the eucharist.

proface

English

(Webster 1913)

Interjection

proface!
  • (obsolete) Much good may it do you! — a familiar salutation or welcome.
  • (Shakespeare)

    References

    *

    preface

    Alternative forms

    * (archaic)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The beginning or introductory portion that comes before the main text of a document or book.
  • The book included a brief preface by a leading expert in the field.
  • An introduction, or series of preliminary remarks.
  • * Shakespeare
  • This superficial tale / Is but a preface of her worthy praise.
  • * Milton
  • Heaven's high behest no preface needs.
  • (Roman Catholic) The prelude or introduction to the canon of the Mass.
  • Verb

    (prefac)
  • To introduce or make a comment before (the main point).
  • Let me preface this by saying that I don't know him that well.
  • To give a preface to.
  • to preface a book

    See also

    * foretalk * foreword * introduction * prelude