Crotchet vs Prank - What's the difference?

crotchet | prank | Related terms |

Crotchet is a related term of prank.


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between crotchet and prank

is that crotchet is (obsolete) to play music in measured time while prank is (obsolete) full of gambols or tricks.

As nouns the difference between crotchet and prank

is that crotchet is (music) a musical note one beat long in 4/4 time while prank is (obsolete) an evil deed; a malicious trick, an act of cruel deception.

As verbs the difference between crotchet and prank

is that crotchet is to make needlework by looping thread with a hooked needle; to crochet while prank is to adorn in a showy manner; to dress or equip ostentatiously.

As an adjective prank is

(obsolete) full of gambols or tricks.

crotchet

Noun

(en noun)
  • (music) A musical note one beat long in 4/4 time.
  • A sharp curve or crook; a shape resembling a hook (obsolete except in crochet hook).
  • (archaic) a whim or a fancy
  • * 1843 , '', book 3, chapter XIII, ''Democracy
  • Thou who walkest in a vain shew, looking out with ornamental dilettante sniff and serene supremacy at all Life and all Death; and amblest jauntily; perking up thy poor talk into crotchets , thy poor conduct into fatuous somnambulisms
  • * De Quincey
  • He ruined himself and all that trusted in him by crotchets that he could never explain to any rational man.
  • A forked support; a crotch.
  • * Dryden
  • The crotchets of their cot in columns rise.
  • (military, historical) An indentation in the glacis of the covered way, at a point where a traverse is placed.
  • (military) The arrangement of a body of troops, either forward or rearward, so as to form a line nearly perpendicular to the general line of battle.
  • (printing) A bracket.
  • Synonyms

    * (musical note) quarter note (US)

    Derived terms

    * crotchety

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to make needlework by looping thread with a hooked needle; to crochet
  • (obsolete) to play music in measured time
  • (Donne)
    ---- ==Jèrriais==

    Noun

    (m)
  • (punctuation) bracket
  • Derived terms

    *

    prank

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) An evil deed; a malicious trick, an act of cruel deception.
  • *, II.4.2.ii:
  • Hercules, after all his mad pranks upon his wife and children, was perfectly cured by a purge of hellebor, which an Antieyrian administered unto him.
  • A practical joke or mischievous trick.
  • * Shakespeare
  • His pranks have been too broad to bear with.
  • * Sir Walter Raleigh
  • The harpies played their accustomed pranks .
    Pranks may be funny, but remember that some people are aggressive.
    He pulled a gruesome prank on his sister.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * prankish * pranksome * prankster

    Verb

  • To adorn in a showy manner; to dress or equip ostentatiously.
  • * Spenser
  • In sumptuous tire she joyed herself to prank .
  • * 1748 , , B:II
  • And there a Sea?on atween June and May,
    Half prankt with Spring, with Summer half imbrown'd,
    A li?tle?s Climate made, where, Sooth to ?ay,
    No living Wight could work, ne cared even for Play.
  • * 1880 , For Spring, by Sandro Botticelli , lines 2–3
  • ''Flora, wanton-eyed
    ''For birth, and with all flowrets prankt and pied:
  • To make ostentatious show.
  • * M. Arnold
  • White houses prank where once were huts.
  • To perform a practical joke on; to trick.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2007, date=May 13, author=Karen Crouse, title=Still Invitation Only, but Jets Widen Door for Camp, work=New York Times citation
  • , passage=“If someone’s pranking me,” Rowlands remembered thinking, “they’re going to great lengths to make it work.” }}
  • (slang) To call someone's phone and promptly hang up
  • Hey man, prank me when you wanna get picked up.
    I don't have your number in my phone, can you prank me?

    Synonyms

    (call and promptly hang up) missed call, missed-call

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Full of gambols or tricks.
  • (Webster 1913) English transitive verbs