What is the difference between practical and muse?

practical | muse |


As nouns the difference between practical and muse

is that practical is (british) that part of an exam or series of exams in which the candidate has to demonstrate their practical ability while muse is a source of inspiration or muse can be an act of musing; a period of thoughtfulness or muse can be a gap or hole in a hedge, fence, etc through which a wild animal is accustomed to pass; a muset.

As a adjective practical

is based on practice or action rather than theory or hypothesis.

As a verb muse is

to become lost in thought, to ponder.

practical

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (British) A part of an exam or series of exams in which the candidate has to demonstrate their practical ability
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Based on practice or action rather than theory or hypothesis
  • Jack didn't get an engineering degree, but has practical knowledge of metalworking.
  • Being likely to be effective and applicable to a real situation; able to be put to use
  • Jack's knowledge has the practical benefit of giving us useful prototype parts.
  • Of a person, having skills or knowledge that are practical
  • All in all, Jack's a very practical chap

    Antonyms

    * (based on practice or action) theoretical * (being likely to effective and applicable to a real situation) impractical * (of a person) impractical

    Derived terms

    * practicality * practically

    muse

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) muse, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (s)
  • A source of inspiration.
  • (archaic) A poet; a bard.
  • (Milton)
    Usage notes
    The plural musae'' can also be found, though it is much rarer than ''muses .

    Etymology 2

    First attested in 1340. From (etyl) muser.

    Verb

    (mus)
  • To become lost in thought, to ponder.
  • To say (something) with due consideration or thought.
  • * (seeCites)
  • To think on; to meditate on.
  • * (rfdate) Thomson
  • Come, then, expressive Silence, muse his praise.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-07, author=David Simpson
  • , volume=188, issue=26, page=36, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Fantasy of navigation , passage=It is tempting to speculate about the incentives or compulsions that might explain why anyone would take to the skies in [the] basket [of a balloon]: […];  […]; or perhaps to muse on the irrelevance of the borders that separate nation states and keep people from understanding their shared environment.}}
  • To wonder at.
  • (Shakespeare)
    Synonyms
    * See also

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An act of musing; a period of thoughtfulness.
  • * 1590 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , I.xii:
  • still he sate long time astonished / As in great muse , ne word to creature spake.
  • * 1978 , (Lawrence Durrell), Livia , Faber & Faber 1992 (Avignon Quintet), p. 416:
  • He fell into a muse and pulled his upper lip.

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) musse. See muset.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A gap or hole in a hedge, fence, etc. through which a wild animal is accustomed to pass; a muset.
  • Find a hare without a muse . (old proverb)

    Anagrams

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