Profession vs Possession - What's the difference?

profession | possession |


As nouns the difference between profession and possession

is that profession is a promise or vow made on entering a religious order while possession is control or occupancy of something for which one does not necessarily have private property rights.

As a verb possession is

(obsolete) to invest with property.

profession

Noun

(en noun)
  • A promise or vow made on entering a religious order.
  • She died only a few years after her profession .
  • * 1796 , Matthew Lewis, The Monk , Folio Society 1985, p. 27:
  • Rosario was a young novice belonging to the monastery, who in three months intended to make his profession .
  • A declaration of belief, faith or of one's opinion.
  • Despite his continued professions of innocence, the court eventually sentenced him to five years.
  • An occupation, trade, craft, or activity in which one has a professed expertise in a particular area; a job, especially one requiring a high level of skill or training.
  • My father was a barrister by profession .
  • The practitioners of such an occupation collectively.
  • His conduct is against the established practices of the legal profession .

    Derived terms

    * professional * liberal profession

    possession

    English

    Noun

    (wikipedia possession) (en noun)
  • Control or occupancy of something for which one does not necessarily have private property rights.
  • Something that is owned.
  • The car quickly became his most prized possession .
    I would gladly give all of my worldly possessions just to be able to do that.
  • Ownership]]; [[take, taking, holding, keeping something as one's own.
  • The car is in my possession .
    I'm in possession of the car.
  • A territory under the rule of another country.
  • Réunion is the largest of France's overseas possessions .
  • The condition or affliction of being possessed by a demon or other supernatural entity.
  • Back then, people with psychiatric disorders were sometimes thought to be victims of demonic possession .
  • * Shakespeare
  • How long hath this possession held the man?
  • (sports) Control of the ball; the opportunity to be on the offensive.
  • The scoreboard shows a little football symbol next to the name of the team that has possession .
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Chris Whyatt , title=Chelsea 1 - 0 Bolton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Their first half was marred by the entire side playing too deep, completely unable to build up any form of decent possession once the ball left their bewildered defence.}}
  • (linguistics) A syntactic relationship between two nouns or nominals that may be used to indicate ownership.
  • Some languages distinguish between a construction like 'my car', which shows alienable possession''' — the car could become someone else's — and one like 'my foot', which has inalienable '''possession — my foot will always be mine.

    Usage notes

    * One who possesses is often said to have possession (of)'', ''hold possession (of)'', or ''be in possession (of) . * One who acquires is often said to take possession (of)'', ''gain possession (of)'', or ''come into possession (of) .

    Synonyms

    * ight (obsolete) * owndom, retention * See also

    Antonyms

    * absence

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To invest with property.
  • (Webster 1913)

    Statistics

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