Omission vs Possession - What's the difference?

omission | possession |


As nouns the difference between omission and possession

is that omission is the act of omitting while possession is control or occupancy of something for which one does not necessarily have private property rights.

As a verb possession is

(obsolete) to invest with property.

omission

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The act of omitting.
  • The act of neglecting to perform an action one has an obligation to do.
  • Something deleted or left out.
  • Something not done or neglected.
  • (grammar) The shortening of a word or phrase, using an apostrophe ( ' ) to replace the missing letters, often used to approximate the sound of speech or a specific dialect.
  • Usage notes

    Following are common examples of omission using an apostrophe: : six o’clock (shortening of “six of the clock”) : The high school class of ’69 (shortening of “1969”) : O’er there (shortening of “over there”) * From Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn : *: S’pose people left money laying around where he was—what did he do? He collared it. S’pose he contracted to do a thing; and you paid him, and didn’t set down there and see that he done it—what did he do? He always done the other thing. S’pose he opened his mouth—what then? If he didn't shut it up powerful quick, he'd lose a lie, every time. That’s the kind of a bug Henry was; and if we’d ’a’ had him along ’stead of our kings, he’d ’a’ fooled that town a heap worse than ourn done.

    See also

    * contraction ----

    possession

    English

    Noun

    (wikipedia possession) (en noun)
  • Control or occupancy of something for which one does not necessarily have private property rights.
  • Something that is owned.
  • The car quickly became his most prized possession .
    I would gladly give all of my worldly possessions just to be able to do that.
  • Ownership]]; [[take, taking, holding, keeping something as one's own.
  • The car is in my possession .
    I'm in possession of the car.
  • A territory under the rule of another country.
  • Réunion is the largest of France's overseas possessions .
  • The condition or affliction of being possessed by a demon or other supernatural entity.
  • Back then, people with psychiatric disorders were sometimes thought to be victims of demonic possession .
  • * Shakespeare
  • How long hath this possession held the man?
  • (sports) Control of the ball; the opportunity to be on the offensive.
  • The scoreboard shows a little football symbol next to the name of the team that has possession .
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Chris Whyatt , title=Chelsea 1 - 0 Bolton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Their first half was marred by the entire side playing too deep, completely unable to build up any form of decent possession once the ball left their bewildered defence.}}
  • (linguistics) A syntactic relationship between two nouns or nominals that may be used to indicate ownership.
  • Some languages distinguish between a construction like 'my car', which shows alienable possession''' — the car could become someone else's — and one like 'my foot', which has inalienable '''possession — my foot will always be mine.

    Usage notes

    * One who possesses is often said to have possession (of)'', ''hold possession (of)'', or ''be in possession (of) . * One who acquires is often said to take possession (of)'', ''gain possession (of)'', or ''come into possession (of) .

    Synonyms

    * ight (obsolete) * owndom, retention * See also

    Antonyms

    * absence

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To invest with property.
  • (Webster 1913)

    Statistics

    * ----