Honied vs Ponied - What's the difference?

honied | ponied |


As an adjective honied

is covered with or containing honey.

As a verb ponied is

(pony).

honied

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Covered with or containing honey
  • * {{quote-book, year=1836, author=William A. Alcott, title=The Young Mother, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=It must be buttered, or honied , or toasted, or soaked in milk, or dipped in gravy. }}
  • * {{quote-book, year=1913, author=John L. Stoddard, title=Poems, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=One of the pair Is a woman fair, With parted, smiling lips; For her each hour A honied flower, And she the bee that sips. }}
  • As sweet as honey
  • * {{quote-book, year=1903, author=Ambrose Bierce, title=Shapes of Clay, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=From the same lips the honied phrases fall That still are bitter from cascades of gall. }}

    ponied

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (pony)
  • Anagrams

    *

    pony

    English

    (wikipedia pony)

    Etymology 1

    1659 from (etyl) (cognate to English foal).

    Noun

    (ponies)
  • Any of several small breeds of horse under 14.2 hands.
  • (regional) A small serving of an alcoholic beverage.
  • * 1969 , Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor , Penguin 2011, p. 193:
  • Demon popped into his mouth a last morsel of black bread with elastic samlet, gulped down a last pony of vodka and took his place at the table with Marina facing him across its oblong length.
  • * 2010 , Dick Lynas, Pies Were for Thursdays: Tales from an Ordinary Glasgow East End Childhood , page 283,
  • I did not even know what a ‘pony'’, a small chaser of beer, was. But of course I could not admit that. So putting on an air of nonchalance, and a deep voice, I strolled into a pub with one of the other equally naive guys and we ordered two ' ponies of beer.
    ‘McEwans?’ asked the barman.
    ‘Naw - ponies ’ said I.
  • (Australia, New South Wales, Victoria) A serving of 140 millilitres of beer.
  • (UK, slang) Twenty-five pounds sterling.
  • (US, slang) A translation used as a study aid; loosely, a crib, a cheat-sheet.
  • (Cockney rhyming slang) (from "pony and trap" ) Crap; rubbish, nonsense.
  • Synonyms
    * (l)
    Derived terms
    * dog and pony show * play the ponies * polo pony * pony and trap * pony chaise * pony engine * pony express * pony glass * pony keg * pony truck * pony truss * pony up * Shetland pony

    Verb

  • To lead (a horse) from another horse.
  • Etymology 2

    Shortened from (pony and trap), rhyming with (crap)

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (Cockney rhyming slang) Of little worth.
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