Plump vs Plumped - What's the difference?

plump | plumped |


As verbs the difference between plump and plumped

is that plump is to grow ; to swell out while plumped is (plump).

As an adjective plump

is having a full and rounded shape; chubby, somewhat overweight.

As an adverb plump

is directly; suddenly; perpendicularly.

As a noun plump

is (obsolete) a knot or cluster; a group; a crowd.

plump

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • To grow ; to swell out.
  • Her cheeks have plumped .
  • To drop or fall suddenly or heavily, all at once.
  • * Spectator
  • Dulcissa plumps into a chair.
  • To make plump; to fill (out) or support; often with up .
  • * Fuller
  • to plump up the hollowness of their history with improbable miracles
  • To cast or let drop all at once, suddenly and heavily.
  • to plump a stone into water
  • To give a plumper (kind of vote).
  • To give (a vote), as a plumper.
  • (used with for) To favor or decide in favor of something.
  • "A recent poll by the New York Times found that although most Brazilians plump for arch-rival Argentina as the team they most want to lose, the second-biggest group want Brazil itself to stumble." source: http://www.economist.com/news/americas/21600983-brazilian-workers-are-gloriously-unproductive-economy-grow-they-must-snap-out

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • Having a full and rounded shape; chubby, somewhat overweight.
  • * (Thomas Carew) (1595-1640)
  • The god of wine did his plump clusters bring.
  • *
  • Fat.
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    Antonyms

    * See also

    Adverb

  • Directly; suddenly; perpendicularly.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A knot or cluster; a group; a crowd.
  • a plump of trees, fowls, or spears
    To visit islands and the plumps of men. — Chapman.

    References

    * ----

    plumped

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (plump)

  • plump

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To grow ; to swell out.
  • Her cheeks have plumped .
  • To drop or fall suddenly or heavily, all at once.
  • * Spectator
  • Dulcissa plumps into a chair.
  • To make plump; to fill (out) or support; often with up .
  • * Fuller
  • to plump up the hollowness of their history with improbable miracles
  • To cast or let drop all at once, suddenly and heavily.
  • to plump a stone into water
  • To give a plumper (kind of vote).
  • To give (a vote), as a plumper.
  • (used with for) To favor or decide in favor of something.
  • "A recent poll by the New York Times found that although most Brazilians plump for arch-rival Argentina as the team they most want to lose, the second-biggest group want Brazil itself to stumble." source: http://www.economist.com/news/americas/21600983-brazilian-workers-are-gloriously-unproductive-economy-grow-they-must-snap-out

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • Having a full and rounded shape; chubby, somewhat overweight.
  • * (Thomas Carew) (1595-1640)
  • The god of wine did his plump clusters bring.
  • *
  • Fat.
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    Antonyms

    * See also

    Adverb

  • Directly; suddenly; perpendicularly.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A knot or cluster; a group; a crowd.
  • a plump of trees, fowls, or spears
    To visit islands and the plumps of men. — Chapman.

    References

    * ----