Dialogue vs Plot - What's the difference?

dialogue | plot |


As verbs the difference between dialogue and plot

is that dialogue is while plot is to conceive (a crime, etc).

As a noun plot is

the course of a story, comprising a series of incidents which are gradually unfolded, sometimes by unexpected means.

dialogue

English

Alternative forms

* (US and computing) dialog

Noun

(en noun)
  • A conversation or other form of discourse between two or more individuals.
  • Bill and Melinda maintained a dialogue via email over the course of their long-distance relationship.
  • * 2013 , Paul Harris, Lance Armstrong faces multi-million dollar legal challenges after confession'' (in ''The Guardian , 19 January 2013)[http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2013/jan/19/lance-armstrong-legal-challenges-confession]
  • The hours of dialogue with Winfrey, which culminated in a choked-up moment on Friday night as he discussed the impact of his cheating on his family, appear to have failed to give Armstrong the redemption that he craves.
  • In a dramatic or literary presentation, the verbal parts of the script or text; the verbalizations of the actors or characters.
  • The movie had great special effects, but the dialogue was lackluster.
  • A literary form, where the presentation resembles a conversation.
  • A literary historian, she specialized in the dialogues of ancient Greek philosophers.
  • (computing) A dialogue box.
  • Once the My Computer dialogue opens, select Local Disk (C:), then right click and scroll down.

    Antonyms

    * introspection * monologue * multilogue

    Derived terms

    ( conversation or other form of discourse between two or more individuals) * dialogic * dialogical * dialogically * dialogism * dialogist * dialogistic * dialogistically * dialogize * modal dialogue

    Verb

    (dialogu)
  • (informal, business) To discuss or negotiate so that all parties can reach an understanding.
  • Pearson wanted to dialogue with his overseas counterparts about the new reporting requirements.
  • (obsolete) To take part in a dialogue; to dialogize.
  • (Shakespeare)

    plot

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The course of a story, comprising a series of incidents which are gradually unfolded, sometimes by unexpected means.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • If the plot or intrigue must be natural, and such as springs from the subject, then the winding up of the plot must be a probable consequence of all that went before.
  • An area or land used for building on or planting on.
  • A graph or diagram drawn by hand or produced by a mechanical or electronic device.
  • A secret plan to achieve an end, the end or means usually being illegal or otherwise questionable.
  • The plot would have enabled them to get a majority on the board.
    The assassination of Lincoln was part of a larger plot .
  • * Shakespeare
  • I have overheard a plot of death.
  • * Addison
  • O, think what anxious moments pass between / The birth of plots and their last fatal periods!
  • Contrivance; deep reach thought; ability to plot or intrigue.
  • * Denham
  • a man of much plot
  • Participation in any stratagem or conspiracy.
  • * Milton
  • And when Christ saith, Who marries the divorced commits adultery, it is to be understood, if he had any plot in the divorce.
  • A plan; a purpose.
  • * Jeremy Taylor
  • no other plot in their religion but serve God and save their souls

    Synonyms

    * (course of a story) storyline * (area) parcel * (secret plan) conspiracy, scheme

    Derived terms

    * Gunpowder Plot * lose the plot * plotless * subplot * the plot thickens/plot thickens

    Verb

    (plott)
  • To conceive (a crime, etc).
  • They had ''plotted a robbery.
  • To trace out (a graph or diagram).
  • They ''plotted'' the number of edits per day.
  • To mark (a point on a graph, chart, etc).
  • Every five minutes they ''plotted'' their position.
  • * Carew
  • This treatise plotteth down Cornwall as it now standeth.
  • To conceive a crime, misdeed, etc.
  • ''They were plotting against the king.

    Synonyms

    * (contrive) becast * (sense) scheme

    Derived terms

    * replot

    Anagrams

    * * English control verbs ----