Prink vs Plink - What's the difference?

prink | plink |


As verbs the difference between prink and plink

is that prink is (obsolete|or|dialectal) to give a wink; to wink or prink can be to look, gaze while plink is (colloquial) to play a song or a portion of a song, usually on a percussion instrument such as a piano.

As nouns the difference between prink and plink

is that prink is the act of adjusting dress or appearance; a sprucing up while plink is a short, high-pitched sound.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

prink

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) . More at .

Verb

(en verb)
  • (obsolete, or, dialectal) to give a wink; to wink.
  • Etymology 2

    Perhaps alteration (due to primp) of , (etyl) and (etyl) prunk.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • the act of adjusting dress or appearance; a sprucing up
  • * 2006 , Louisa May Alcott, Little Women :
  • [...] And does my hair look very bad?", said Meg, as she turned from the glass in Mrs. Gardiner's dressing room after a prolonged prink .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to look, gaze
  • to dress finely, primp, preen, spruce up
  • to strut, put on pompous airs, be pretentious
  • Synonyms
    * (l)

    plink

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A short, high-pitched sound
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • (colloquial) To play a song or a portion of a song, usually on a percussion instrument such as a piano.
  • * 1971: Louis C. Reichman, Barry J. Wishart, American Politics and Its Interpreters
  • He can plink out Let Me Call You Sweetheart for reporters on a piano or rib himself on television talk shows....
  • * 1997: Kevin Osborn, Signe Larson, The Complete Idiot's Guide to Bringing Up Baby
  • Your child may also begin to plink out a few notes on a xylophone or toy piano before her first birthday.
  • * 2004: Angela Elwell Hunt, The Truth Teller
  • The female deputy sat down at the ramshackle piano and proceeded to plink out the opening notes of "Heart and Soul."
    English onomatopoeias