Slosh vs Plash - What's the difference?

slosh | plash | Related terms |

Slosh is a related term of plash.


As verbs the difference between slosh and plash

is that slosh is (of a liquid) to shift chaotically; to splash noisily while plash is to splash or plash can be to cut partly, or to bend and intertwine the branches of.

As nouns the difference between slosh and plash

is that slosh is a quantity of a liquid; more than a splash or slosh can be (computing) backslash, the character while plash is (uk|dialectal) a small pool of standing water; a puddle or plash can be the branch of a tree partly cut or bent, and bound to, or intertwined with, other branches.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

slosh

English

(wikipedia slosh)

Etymology 1

(onomatopoeia); compare splash, splosh.

Verb

(es)
  • (of a liquid) To shift chaotically; to splash noisily.
  • The water in his bottle sloshed back and forth as he ran.
  • (British, colloquial, transitive) To punch (someone).
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1960 , author= , title=(Jeeves in the Offing) , section=chapter VIII , passage=She greeted me with a bright smile, and said: “Back already? Did you find it?” With a strong effort I mastered my emotion and replied curtly but civilly that the answer was in the negative. “No,” I said, “I did not find it.” “You can't have looked properly.” Again I was compelled to pause and remind myself that an English gentleman does not slosh a sitting redhead, no matter what the provocation.}}

    Noun

    (es)
  • A quantity of a liquid; more than a splash
  • As the show progressed, a dollop of backfin crabmeat and a slice of mozzarella was added to the veal, fresh sliced white mushrooms to the beef, followed by a slosh''' of white wine in one pan and a '''slosh of brandy in the other.
    Coordinate terms
    * splash

    Etymology 2

    By analogy with (slash).

    Noun

    (es)
  • (computing) backslash, the character .
  • plash

    English

    Etymology 1

    .

    Noun

    (plashes)
  • (UK, dialectal) A small pool of standing water; a puddle.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , II.viii:
  • Out of the wound the red bloud flowed fresh, / That vnderneath his feet soone made a purple plesh .
    (Francis Bacon)
  • * Isaac Barrow
  • These shallow plashes .
  • A splash, or the sound made by a splash.
  • * Henry James, The Aspern Papers
  • Presently a gondola passed along the canal with its slow rhythmical plash , and as we listened we watched it in silence.

    Verb

  • To splash.
  • * Keats
  • plashing among bedded pebbles
  • * Longfellow
  • Far below him plashed the waters.
  • *
  • To cause a splash.
  • To splash or sprinkle with colouring matter.
  • to plash a wall in imitation of granite

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) plaissier, . Compare pleach.

    Noun

    (plashes)
  • The branch of a tree partly cut or bent, and bound to, or intertwined with, other branches.
  • Verb

  • To cut partly, or to bend and intertwine the branches of.
  • * to plash a hedge
  • (Evelyn)

    Anagrams

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