Ripple vs Plash - What's the difference?

ripple | plash | Related terms |

Ripple is a related term of plash.


As nouns the difference between ripple and plash

is that ripple is a moving disturbance or undulation in the surface of a liquid while plash is (uk|dialectal) a small pool of standing water; a puddle or plash can be the branch of a tree partly cut or bent, and bound to, or intertwined with, other branches.

As verbs the difference between ripple and plash

is that ripple is to move like the undulating surface of a body of water; to undulate while plash is to splash or plash can be to cut partly, or to bend and intertwine the branches of.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

ripple

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A moving disturbance or undulation in the surface of a liquid.
  • I dropped a small stone into the pond and watched the ripples .
  • A sound similar to that of undulating water.
  • A style of ice cream in which flavors have been coarsely blended together.
  • I enjoy fudge ripple''' ice cream, but I especially like to dig through the carton to get at the '''ripple part and eat only that.
  • (electronics) A small oscillation of an otherwise steady signal.
  • An implement, with teeth like those of a comb, for removing the seeds and seed vessels from flax, broom corn, etc.
  • Verb

  • To move like the undulating surface of a body of water; to undulate.
  • To propagate like a moving wave.
  • * 2008 , Bradley Simpson, Economists with Guns , page 65:
  • These problems were complicated by a foreign exchange crunch which rippled through the economy in 1961-1962, [...].
  • To make a sound as of water running gently over a rough bottom, or the breaking of ripples on the shore.
  • To remove the seeds from (the stalks of flax, etc.), by means of a ripple.
  • (by extension) To scratch or tear.
  • (Holland)

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    plash

    English

    Etymology 1

    .

    Noun

    (plashes)
  • (UK, dialectal) A small pool of standing water; a puddle.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , II.viii:
  • Out of the wound the red bloud flowed fresh, / That vnderneath his feet soone made a purple plesh .
    (Francis Bacon)
  • * Isaac Barrow
  • These shallow plashes .
  • A splash, or the sound made by a splash.
  • * Henry James, The Aspern Papers
  • Presently a gondola passed along the canal with its slow rhythmical plash , and as we listened we watched it in silence.

    Verb

  • To splash.
  • * Keats
  • plashing among bedded pebbles
  • * Longfellow
  • Far below him plashed the waters.
  • *
  • To cause a splash.
  • To splash or sprinkle with colouring matter.
  • to plash a wall in imitation of granite

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) plaissier, . Compare pleach.

    Noun

    (plashes)
  • The branch of a tree partly cut or bent, and bound to, or intertwined with, other branches.
  • Verb

  • To cut partly, or to bend and intertwine the branches of.
  • * to plash a hedge
  • (Evelyn)

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