Plant vs Seed - What's the difference?

plant | seed |


As nouns the difference between plant and seed

is that plant is an organism that is not an animal, especially an organism capable of photosynthesis typically a small or herbaceous organism of this kind, rather than a tree while seed is (senseid)(countable) a fertilized grain, initially encased in a fruit, which may grow into a mature plant.

As verbs the difference between plant and seed

is that plant is to place (a seed or plant) in soil or other substrate in order that it may live and grow while seed is to plant or sow an area with seeds.

plant

English

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Noun

(s)
  • An organism that is not an animal, especially an organism capable of photosynthesis. Typically a small or herbaceous organism of this kind, rather than a tree.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katrina G. Claw
  • , title= Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm , volume=101, issue=3, page=217, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=In plants , the ability to recognize self from nonself plays an important role in fertilization, because self-fertilization will result in less diverse offspring than fertilization with pollen from another individual. Many genes with reproductive roles also have antibacterial and immune functions, which indicate that the threat of microbial attack on the sperm or egg may be a major influence on rapid evolution during reproduction.}}
  • (botany) An organism of the kingdom Plantae''; now specifically, a living organism of the ''Embryophyta'' (land plants) or of the ''Chlorophyta'' (green algae), a eukaryote that includes double-membraned chloroplasts in its cells containing chlorophyll ''a'' and ''b , or any organism closely related to such an organism.
  • (ecology) Now specifically, a multicellular eukaryote that includes chloroplasts in its cells, which have a cell wall.
  • Any creature that grows on soil or similar surfaces, including plants and fungi.
  • A factory or other industrial or institutional building or facility.
  • An object placed surreptitiously in order to cause suspicion to fall upon a person.
  • Anyone assigned to behave as a member of the public during a covert operation (as in a police investigation).
  • A person, placed amongst an audience, whose role is to cause confusion, laughter etc.
  • (snooker) A play in which the cue ball knocks one (usually red) ball onto another, in order to pot the second; a set.
  • * 2008 , Phil Yates, The Times , April 28 2008:
  • O’Sullivan risked a plant that went badly astray, splitting the reds.
  • A large piece of machinery, such as the kind used in earthmoving or construction.
  • (obsolete) A young tree; a sapling; hence, a stick or staff.
  • * Dryden
  • a plant of stubborn oak
  • (obsolete) The sole of the foot.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • * knotty legs and plants of clay
  • (dated, slang) A plan; a swindle; a trick.
  • * Charles Dickens
  • It wasn't a bad plant , that of mine, on Fikey.
  • An oyster which has been bedded, in distinction from one of natural growth.
  • (US, dialect) A young oyster suitable for transplanting.
  • Usage notes

    The scientific definition of what organisms should be considered plants changed dramatically during the 20th century. Bacteria, algae, and fungi are no longer considered plants by those who study them. Many textbooks do not reflect the most current thinking on classification.

    Derived terms

    * houseplant * planter * plantlet * plantly * plant-pot * pot-plant * power plant * plant room

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To place (a seed or plant) in soil or other substrate in order that it may live and grow.
  • To place (an object, or sometimes a person), often with the implication of intending deceit.
  • That gun's not mine! It was planted there by the real murderer!
  • To place or set something firmly or with conviction.
  • Plant your feet firmly and give the rope a good tug.
    to plant''' cannon against a fort; to '''plant''' a flag; to '''plant one's feet on solid ground
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=January 15 , author=Sam Sheringham , title=Chelsea 2 - 0 Blackburn Rovers , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=First Anelka curled a shot wide from just outside the box, then Lampard planted a header over the bar from Bosingwa's cross.}}
  • To place in the ground.
  • * 2007 , Richard Laymon, Savage , page 118:
  • Sarah, she kissed each of her grandparents on the forehead. They were planted in a graveyard behind the church.
  • To furnish or supply with plants.
  • to plant a garden, an orchard, or a forest
  • To engender; to generate; to set the germ of.
  • * Shakespeare
  • It engenders choler, planteth anger.
  • To furnish with a fixed and organized population; to settle; to establish.
  • to plant a colony
  • * Francis Bacon
  • planting of countries like planting of woods
  • To introduce and establish the principles or seeds of.
  • to plant Christianity among the heathen
  • To set up; to install; to instate.
  • * Shakespeare
  • We will plant some other in the throne.

    Derived terms

    * faceplant, handplant * plant out

    See also

    * (wikipedia) 1000 English basic words ----

    seed

    English

    Noun

    (wikipedia seed)
  • (senseid)(countable) A fertilized grain, initially encased in a fruit, which may grow into a mature plant.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= David Van Tassel], [http://www.americanscientist.org/authors/detail/lee-dehaan Lee DeHaan
  • , title= Wild Plants to the Rescue , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Plant breeding is always a numbers game.
  • (countable, botany) A fertilized ovule, containing an embryonic plant.
  • (uncountable) An amount of fertilized grain that cannot be readily counted.
  • (uncountable) Semen.
  • (countable) A precursor.
  • (countable) The initial state, condition or position of a changing, growing or developing process; the ultimate precursor in a defined chain of precursors.
  • # The initial position of a competitor or team in a tournament. (seed position)
  • The team with the best regular season record receives the top seed in the conference tournament.
  • # The competitor or team occupying a given seed. (seed position)
  • The rookie was a surprising top seed .
  • # Initialization state of a . (seed number)
  • If you use the same seed you will get exactly the same pattern of numbers.
  • # Commercial message in a creative format placed on relevant sites on the Internet. (seed idea or seed message)
  • The latest seed has attracted a lot of users in our online community.
  • Offspring, descendants, progeny.
  • the seed of Abraham
  • * 1590 , , II.x:
  • Next him king Leyr in happie peace long raind, / But had no issue male him to succeed, / But three faire daughters, which were well vptraind, / In all that seemed fit for kingly seed
  • Race; generation; birth.
  • * Waller
  • Of mortal seed they were not held.

    Usage notes

    The common use of seed differs from the botanical use. The “seeds” of sunflowers are botanically fruits.

    Derived terms

    * crack seed * go to seed * seedcake * seedling * seed potato * seedy * spill one's seed

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To plant or sow an area with seeds.
  • I seeded my lawn with bluegrass.
  • To cover thinly with something scattered; to ornament with seedlike decorations.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • a sable mantle seeded with waking eyes
  • To start; to provide, assign or determine the initial resources for, position of, state of.
  • A venture capitalist seeds young companies.
    The tournament coordinator will seed the starting lineup with the best competitors from the qualifying round.
    The programmer seeded fresh, uncorrupted data into the database before running unit tests.
  • (sports, games) To allocate a seeding to a competitor.
  • To be able to compete (especially in a quarter-final/semi-final/final).
  • The tennis player seeded into the quarters.
  • To ejaculate inside the penetratee during intercourse, especially in the rectum.
  • Anagrams

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