Fleet vs Plant - What's the difference?

fleet | plant |


As a proper noun fleet

is the stream that ran where fleet street now runs.

As a noun plant is

an organism that is not an animal, especially an organism capable of photosynthesis typically a small or herbaceous organism of this kind, rather than a tree.

As a verb plant is

to place (a seed or plant) in soil or other substrate in order that it may live and grow.

fleet

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A group of vessels or vehicles.
  • Any group of associated items.
  • * 2004 , Jim Hoskins, Building an on Demand Computing Environment with IBM
  • This is especially true in distributed printing environments, where a fleet of printers is shared by users on a network.
  • (nautical) A number of vessels in company, especially war vessels; also, the collective naval force of a country, etc.
  • (nautical, British Royal Navy) Any command of vessels exceeding a squadron in size, or a rear-admiral's command, composed of five sail-of-the-line, with any number of smaller vessels.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A flood; a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, a river subject to the tide. cognate to Low German fleet
  • * Matthewes
  • Together wove we nets to entrap the fish / In floods and sedgy fleets .
  • (nautical) A location, as on a navigable river, where barges are secured.
  • Derived terms
    * Fleet * fleet in being * Fleet Street * merchant fleet

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To float.
  • [Antony] "Our sever'd navy too,
    Have knit again, and fleet, threat'ning most sea-like."'' -- Shakespeare, ''Antony and Cleopatra
  • To pass over rapidly; to skim the surface of
  • a ship that fleets the gulf
    (Spenser)
  • To hasten over; to cause to pass away lightly, or in mirth and joy
  • * Shakespeare
  • Many young gentlemen flock to him, and fleet the time carelessly.
    And so through this dark world they fleet / Divided, till in death they meet;'' -- Percy Shelley, ''Rosalind and Helen .
  • (nautical) To move up a rope, so as to haul to more advantage; especially to draw apart the blocks of a tackle.
  • (Totten)
  • (nautical, obsolete) To shift the position of dead-eyes when the shrouds are become too long.
  • To cause to slip down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or chain.
  • To take the cream from; to skim.
  • Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • (literary) Swift in motion; moving with velocity; light and quick in going from place to place; nimble; fast.
  • * Milton
  • In mail their horses clad, yet fleet and strong.
  • * 1908:
  • (uncommon) Light; superficially thin; not penetrating deep, as soil.
  • (Mortimer)

    plant

    English

    {{picdic , image=Ranunculus asiaticus4LEST.jpg , width=250 , height=400 , detail1= , detail2= }}

    Noun

    (s)
  • An organism that is not an animal, especially an organism capable of photosynthesis. Typically a small or herbaceous organism of this kind, rather than a tree.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katrina G. Claw
  • , title= Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm , volume=101, issue=3, page=217, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=In plants , the ability to recognize self from nonself plays an important role in fertilization, because self-fertilization will result in less diverse offspring than fertilization with pollen from another individual. Many genes with reproductive roles also have antibacterial and immune functions, which indicate that the threat of microbial attack on the sperm or egg may be a major influence on rapid evolution during reproduction.}}
  • (botany) An organism of the kingdom Plantae''; now specifically, a living organism of the ''Embryophyta'' (land plants) or of the ''Chlorophyta'' (green algae), a eukaryote that includes double-membraned chloroplasts in its cells containing chlorophyll ''a'' and ''b , or any organism closely related to such an organism.
  • (ecology) Now specifically, a multicellular eukaryote that includes chloroplasts in its cells, which have a cell wall.
  • Any creature that grows on soil or similar surfaces, including plants and fungi.
  • A factory or other industrial or institutional building or facility.
  • An object placed surreptitiously in order to cause suspicion to fall upon a person.
  • Anyone assigned to behave as a member of the public during a covert operation (as in a police investigation).
  • A person, placed amongst an audience, whose role is to cause confusion, laughter etc.
  • (snooker) A play in which the cue ball knocks one (usually red) ball onto another, in order to pot the second; a set.
  • * 2008 , Phil Yates, The Times , April 28 2008:
  • O‚ÄôSullivan risked a plant that went badly astray, splitting the reds.
  • A large piece of machinery, such as the kind used in earthmoving or construction.
  • (obsolete) A young tree; a sapling; hence, a stick or staff.
  • * Dryden
  • a plant of stubborn oak
  • (obsolete) The sole of the foot.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • * knotty legs and plants of clay
  • (dated, slang) A plan; a swindle; a trick.
  • * Charles Dickens
  • It wasn't a bad plant , that of mine, on Fikey.
  • An oyster which has been bedded, in distinction from one of natural growth.
  • (US, dialect) A young oyster suitable for transplanting.
  • Usage notes

    The scientific definition of what organisms should be considered plants changed dramatically during the 20th century. Bacteria, algae, and fungi are no longer considered plants by those who study them. Many textbooks do not reflect the most current thinking on classification.

    Derived terms

    * houseplant * planter * plantlet * plantly * plant-pot * pot-plant * power plant * plant room

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To place (a seed or plant) in soil or other substrate in order that it may live and grow.
  • To place (an object, or sometimes a person), often with the implication of intending deceit.
  • That gun's not mine! It was planted there by the real murderer!
  • To place or set something firmly or with conviction.
  • Plant your feet firmly and give the rope a good tug.
    to plant''' cannon against a fort; to '''plant''' a flag; to '''plant one's feet on solid ground
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=January 15 , author=Sam Sheringham , title=Chelsea 2 - 0 Blackburn Rovers , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=First Anelka curled a shot wide from just outside the box, then Lampard planted a header over the bar from Bosingwa's cross.}}
  • To place in the ground.
  • * 2007 , Richard Laymon, Savage , page 118:
  • Sarah, she kissed each of her grandparents on the forehead. They were planted in a graveyard behind the church.
  • To furnish or supply with plants.
  • to plant a garden, an orchard, or a forest
  • To engender; to generate; to set the germ of.
  • * Shakespeare
  • It engenders choler, planteth anger.
  • To furnish with a fixed and organized population; to settle; to establish.
  • to plant a colony
  • * Francis Bacon
  • planting of countries like planting of woods
  • To introduce and establish the principles or seeds of.
  • to plant Christianity among the heathen
  • To set up; to install; to instate.
  • * Shakespeare
  • We will plant some other in the throne.

    Derived terms

    * faceplant, handplant * plant out

    See also

    * (wikipedia) 1000 English basic words ----