Pitch vs Park - What's the difference?

pitch | park |


As nouns the difference between pitch and park

is that pitch is a sticky, gummy substance secreted by trees; sap or pitch can be a throw; a toss; a cast, as of something from the hand or pitch can be (music) the perceived frequency of a sound or note while park is a tract of ground kept in its natural state, about or adjacent to a residence, as for the preservation of game, for walking, riding, or the like.

As verbs the difference between pitch and park

is that pitch is to cover or smear with pitch or pitch can be (senseid)to throw or pitch can be to produce a note of a given pitch while park is to bring (something such as a vehicle) to a halt or store in a specified place.

pitch

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) . Cognate with Dutch pek, German Pech.

Noun

(es)
  • A sticky, gummy substance secreted by trees; sap.
  • It is hard to get this pitch off of my hand.
  • A dark, extremely viscous material remaining in still after distilling crude oil and tar.
  • They put pitch''' on the mast to protect it.'' ''The barrel was sealed with '''pitch .
    It was pitch black because there was no moon.
  • (geology) pitchstone
  • Derived terms
    * pitch-black, pitchblack * pitchblende

    Verb

    (es)
  • To cover or smear with pitch.
  • To darken; to blacken; to obscure.
  • * Addison
  • Soon he found / The welkin pitched with sullen cloud.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) picchen, . More at pick.

    Noun

    (es)
  • A throw; a toss; a cast, as of something from the hand.
  • (senseid)(baseball) The act of pitching a baseball.
  • (sports) The field on which cricket, soccer, rugby or field hockey is played. In cricket', the pitch is in the centre of the field; see ' cricket pitch .
  • An effort to sell or promote something.
  • The distance between evenly spaced objects, e.g. the teeth of a saw, the turns of a screw thread, or letters in a monospace font.
  • A helical scan with a pitch of zero is equivalent to constant z-axis scanning.
  • The angle at which an object sits.
  • More specifically, the rotation angle about the transverse axis.
  • A level or degree.
  • (aviation) A measure of the degree to which an aircraft's nose tilts up or down.
  • (aviation) A measure of the angle of attack of a propeller.
  • (nautical) The measure of extent to which a nautical vessel rotates on its athwartships axis, causing its bow and stern to go up and down. Compare with roll, yaw and heave.
  • The place where a busker performs.
  • An area in a market (or similar) allocated to a particular trader.
  • A point or peak; the extreme point or degree of elevation or depression; hence, a limit or bound.
  • * 1748 , (David Hume), (w) , Oxford University Press (1973), section 11:
  • But, except the mind be disordered by disease or madness, they never can arrive at such a pitch of vivacity
  • * (John Milton)
  • Driven headlong from the pitch of heaven, down / Into this deep.
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • Enterprises of great pitch and moment.
  • * Addison
  • He lived when learning was at its highest pitch .
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=In the eyes of Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke the apotheosis of the Celebrity was complete. The people of Asquith were not only willing to attend the house-warming, but had been worked up to the pitch of eagerness.}}
  • (climbing) A section of a climb or rock face; specifically, the climbing distance between belays or stances.
  • (caving) A vertical cave passage, only negotiable by using rope or ladders.
  • A person or animal's height.
  • *, II.3.2:
  • Alba the emperor was crook-backed, Epictetus lame; that great Alexander a little man of stature, Augustus Cæsar of the same pitch  […].
    (Hudibras)
  • That point of the ground on which the ball pitches or lights when bowled.
  • A descent; a fall; a thrusting down.
  • The point where a declivity begins; hence, the declivity itself; a descending slope; the degree or rate of descent or slope; slant.
  • (mining) The limit of ground set to a miner who receives a share of the ore taken out.
  • (engineering) The distance from centre to centre of any two adjacent teeth of gearing, measured on the pitch line; called also circular pitch .
  • The length, measured along the axis, of a complete turn of the thread of a screw, or of the helical lines of the blades of a screw propeller.
  • The distance between the centres of holes, as of rivet holes in boiler plates.
  • Verb

    (es)
  • (senseid)To throw.
  • He pitched the horseshoe.
  • (transitive, or, intransitive, baseball) To throw (the ball) toward home plate.
  • The hurler pitched a curveball.
    He pitched high and inside.
  • (baseball) To play baseball in the position of pitcher.
  • Bob pitches today.
  • To throw away; discard.
  • He pitched the candy wrapper.
  • To promote, advertise, or attempt to sell.
  • He pitched the idea for months with no takers.
  • To deliver in a certain tone or style, or with a certain audience in mind.
  • At which level should I pitch my presentation?
  • To assemble or erect (a tent).
  • Pitch the tent over there.
  • To fix or place a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp.
  • * Bible, Genesis xxxi. 25
  • Laban with his brethren pitched in the Mount of Gilead.
  • (ambitransitive, aviation, or, nautical) To move so that the front of an aircraft or ship goes alternatively up and down.
  • The typhoon pitched the deck of the ship.
    The airplane pitched .
  • (golf) To play a short, high, lofty shot that lands with backspin.
  • The only way to get on the green from here is to pitch the ball over the bunker.
  • (cricket) To bounce on the playing surface.
  • The ball pitched well short of the batsman.
  • (intransitive, Bristol, of snow) To settle and build up, without melting.
  • To alight; to settle; to come to rest from flight.
  • * Mortimer
  • the tree whereon they [the bees] pitch
  • To fix one's choice; with on'' or ''upon .
  • * Tillotson
  • Pitch upon the best course of life, and custom will render it the more easy.
  • To plunge or fall; especially, to fall forward; to decline or slope.
  • to pitch from a precipice
    The vessel pitches in a heavy sea.
    The field pitches toward the east.
  • To set, face, or pave with rubble or undressed stones, as an embankment or a roadway.
  • (Knight)
  • To set or fix, as a price or value.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • To discard a card for some gain.
  • Etymology 3

    Unknown

    Noun

    (es)
  • (music) The perceived frequency of a sound or note.
  • The pitch of middle "C" is familiar to many musicians.
  • (music) In an a cappella group, the singer responsible for singing a note for the other members to tune themselves by.
  • Bob, our pitch , let out a clear middle "C" and our conductor gave the signal to start.

    Verb

    (es)
  • To produce a note of a given pitch.
  • To fix or set the tone of.
  • to pitch a tune

    References

    * * Notes:

    park

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An area of land set aside for environment preservation and/or informal recreation.
  • # A tract of ground kept in its natural state, about or adjacent to a residence, as for the preservation of game, for walking, riding, or the like.
  • #* (Edmund Waller) (1606-1687)
  • While in the park I sing, the listening deer / Attend my passion, and forget to fear.
  • # A piece of ground, in or near a city or town, enclosed and kept for ornament and recreation
  • #* , chapter=23
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=If the afternoon was fine they strolled together in the park , very slowly, and with pauses to draw breath wherever the ground sloped upward. The slightest effort made the patient cough.}}
  • #* 1994 , Robert Ferro,The Blue Star :
  • I roamed the streets and parks , as far removed from the idea of art and pretense as I could take myself, discovering there the kind of truth I was supposed to be setting down on paper…
  • # An enclosed parcel of land stocked with animals for hunting, which one may have by prescription or royal grant.
  • # (US) A grassy basin surrounded by mountains.
  • An area used for serious organized purposes.
  • # (rfc-sense) A space occupied by the animals, wagons, pontoons, and materials of all kinds, as ammunition, ordnance stores, hospital stores, provisions, etc., when brought together.
  • # A partially enclosed basin in which oysters are grown.
  • # An area zoned for a particular (industrial or technological) purpose.
  • #* {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-21, author= Chico Harlan
  • , volume=189, issue=2, page=30, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Japan pockets the subsidy … , passage=Across Japan, technology companies and private investors are racing to install devices that until recently they had little interest in: solar panels. Massive solar parks are popping up as part of a rapid build-up that one developer likened to an "explosion."}}
  • # (soccer) A pitch; the area on which a match is played.
  • #* {{quote-news, year=2010, date=December 28, author=Owen Phillips, work=BBC
  • , title= Sunderland 0-2 Blackpool , passage=But because of their dominance in the middle of the park and the sheer volume of chances, Sunderland boss Steve Bruce must have been staggered and sickened in equal measure when the visitors took the lead five minutes after the break.}}
  • (UK) An inventory of matériel.
  • (Australia, NZ) A space in which to leave a car; a parking space.
  • * 2003 , “Johnny”, Melbourne Blackout'', in Sleazegrinder (editor), ''Gigs from Hell: True Stories from Rock and Roll?s Frontline , page 174,
  • We got to the 9th Ward and as luck would have it I found a park for my bro?s car right out the front.
  • * 2010 , Sandy Curtis, Dangerous Deception , Clan Destine Press, Australia, unnumbered page,
  • Once they?d entered the floors of parking spaces, James found a park relatively easily, but Mark had difficulty, and only a swift sprint allowed him to catch up as James walked through the throngs of people in the casino with the determination of a man who didn?t want to be delayed.
  • * 2011 , Antonia Magee, The Property Diaries: A Story of Buying a House, Finding a Man and Making a Home … All on a Single Income! , John Wiley & Sons Australia, unnumbered page,
  • We finally found a park and walked a few blocks to the building.

    Antonyms

    * (a piece of ground in or near a city) building, skyscraper, street

    Synonyms

    * (a piece of ground in or near a city) courtyard, garden, plaza

    Derived terms

    * amusement park * ballpark * car park * national park * parkade * skatepark * theme park * tank park

    References

    * “Park” in James F. Dunnigan and Albert Nofi (1992), Dirty Little Secrets: Military Information You're Not Supposed to Know , Harper, ISBN 978-0688112707, p 28. *

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To bring (something such as a vehicle) to a halt or store in a specified place.
  • You can park the car in front of the house.
    I parked the drive heads of my hard disk before travelling with my laptop.
  • (informal) To defer (a matter) until a later date.
  • Let's park that until next week's meeting.
  • To bring together in a park, or compact body.
  • To enclose in a park, or as in a park.
  • How are we parked , and bounded in a pale. — Shakespeare.
  • (baseball) To hit a home run, to hit the ball out of the park.
  • He really parked that one.
  • (slang) To engage in romantic or sexual activities inside a nonmoving vehicle.
  • They stopped at a romantic overlook, shut off the engine, and parked .
  • (transitive, informal, sometimes reflexive) To sit, recline, or put, especially in a manner suggesting an intent to remain for some time.
  • He came in and parked himself in our living room.
    Park your bags in the hall.
  • (finance) To invest money temporarily in an investment instrument considered to relatively free of risk, especially while awaiting other opportunities.
  • We decided to park our money in a safe, stable, low-yield bond fund until market conditions improve.
  • (Internet) To register a domain name, but make no use of it (See )
  • Antonyms

    (bring to a halt) (l)