Pitch vs Course - What's the difference?

pitch | course |


In context|nautical|lang=en terms the difference between pitch and course

is that pitch is (nautical) the measure of extent to which a nautical vessel rotates on its athwartships axis, causing its bow and stern to go up and down compare with roll, yaw and heave while course is (nautical) the lowest square sail in a fully rigged mast, often named according to the mast.

In context|music|lang=en terms the difference between pitch and course

is that pitch is (music) in an a cappella group, the singer responsible for singing a note for the other members to tune themselves by while course is (music) a pair of strings played together in some musical instruments, like the vihuela.

As nouns the difference between pitch and course

is that pitch is a sticky, gummy substance secreted by trees; sap or pitch can be a throw; a toss; a cast, as of something from the hand or pitch can be (music) the perceived frequency of a sound or note while course is a sequence of events.

As verbs the difference between pitch and course

is that pitch is to cover or smear with pitch or pitch can be (senseid)to throw or pitch can be to produce a note of a given pitch while course is to run or flow (especially of liquids and more particularly blood).

As an adverb course is

(colloquial).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

pitch

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) . Cognate with Dutch pek, German Pech.

Noun

(es)
  • A sticky, gummy substance secreted by trees; sap.
  • It is hard to get this pitch off of my hand.
  • A dark, extremely viscous material remaining in still after distilling crude oil and tar.
  • They put pitch''' on the mast to protect it.'' ''The barrel was sealed with '''pitch .
    It was pitch black because there was no moon.
  • (geology) pitchstone
  • Derived terms
    * pitch-black, pitchblack * pitchblende

    Verb

    (es)
  • To cover or smear with pitch.
  • To darken; to blacken; to obscure.
  • * Addison
  • Soon he found / The welkin pitched with sullen cloud.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) picchen, . More at pick.

    Noun

    (es)
  • A throw; a toss; a cast, as of something from the hand.
  • (senseid)(baseball) The act of pitching a baseball.
  • (sports) The field on which cricket, soccer, rugby or field hockey is played. In cricket', the pitch is in the centre of the field; see ' cricket pitch .
  • An effort to sell or promote something.
  • The distance between evenly spaced objects, e.g. the teeth of a saw, the turns of a screw thread, or letters in a monospace font.
  • A helical scan with a pitch of zero is equivalent to constant z-axis scanning.
  • The angle at which an object sits.
  • More specifically, the rotation angle about the transverse axis.
  • A level or degree.
  • (aviation) A measure of the degree to which an aircraft's nose tilts up or down.
  • (aviation) A measure of the angle of attack of a propeller.
  • (nautical) The measure of extent to which a nautical vessel rotates on its athwartships axis, causing its bow and stern to go up and down. Compare with roll, yaw and heave.
  • The place where a busker performs.
  • An area in a market (or similar) allocated to a particular trader.
  • A point or peak; the extreme point or degree of elevation or depression; hence, a limit or bound.
  • * 1748 , (David Hume), (w) , Oxford University Press (1973), section 11:
  • But, except the mind be disordered by disease or madness, they never can arrive at such a pitch of vivacity
  • * (John Milton)
  • Driven headlong from the pitch of heaven, down / Into this deep.
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • Enterprises of great pitch and moment.
  • * Addison
  • He lived when learning was at its highest pitch .
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=In the eyes of Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke the apotheosis of the Celebrity was complete. The people of Asquith were not only willing to attend the house-warming, but had been worked up to the pitch of eagerness.}}
  • (climbing) A section of a climb or rock face; specifically, the climbing distance between belays or stances.
  • (caving) A vertical cave passage, only negotiable by using rope or ladders.
  • A person or animal's height.
  • *, II.3.2:
  • Alba the emperor was crook-backed, Epictetus lame; that great Alexander a little man of stature, Augustus Cæsar of the same pitch  […].
    (Hudibras)
  • That point of the ground on which the ball pitches or lights when bowled.
  • A descent; a fall; a thrusting down.
  • The point where a declivity begins; hence, the declivity itself; a descending slope; the degree or rate of descent or slope; slant.
  • (mining) The limit of ground set to a miner who receives a share of the ore taken out.
  • (engineering) The distance from centre to centre of any two adjacent teeth of gearing, measured on the pitch line; called also circular pitch .
  • The length, measured along the axis, of a complete turn of the thread of a screw, or of the helical lines of the blades of a screw propeller.
  • The distance between the centres of holes, as of rivet holes in boiler plates.
  • Verb

    (es)
  • (senseid)To throw.
  • He pitched the horseshoe.
  • (transitive, or, intransitive, baseball) To throw (the ball) toward home plate.
  • The hurler pitched a curveball.
    He pitched high and inside.
  • (baseball) To play baseball in the position of pitcher.
  • Bob pitches today.
  • To throw away; discard.
  • He pitched the candy wrapper.
  • To promote, advertise, or attempt to sell.
  • He pitched the idea for months with no takers.
  • To deliver in a certain tone or style, or with a certain audience in mind.
  • At which level should I pitch my presentation?
  • To assemble or erect (a tent).
  • Pitch the tent over there.
  • To fix or place a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp.
  • * Bible, Genesis xxxi. 25
  • Laban with his brethren pitched in the Mount of Gilead.
  • (ambitransitive, aviation, or, nautical) To move so that the front of an aircraft or ship goes alternatively up and down.
  • The typhoon pitched the deck of the ship.
    The airplane pitched .
  • (golf) To play a short, high, lofty shot that lands with backspin.
  • The only way to get on the green from here is to pitch the ball over the bunker.
  • (cricket) To bounce on the playing surface.
  • The ball pitched well short of the batsman.
  • (intransitive, Bristol, of snow) To settle and build up, without melting.
  • To alight; to settle; to come to rest from flight.
  • * Mortimer
  • the tree whereon they [the bees] pitch
  • To fix one's choice; with on'' or ''upon .
  • * Tillotson
  • Pitch upon the best course of life, and custom will render it the more easy.
  • To plunge or fall; especially, to fall forward; to decline or slope.
  • to pitch from a precipice
    The vessel pitches in a heavy sea.
    The field pitches toward the east.
  • To set, face, or pave with rubble or undressed stones, as an embankment or a roadway.
  • (Knight)
  • To set or fix, as a price or value.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • To discard a card for some gain.
  • Etymology 3

    Unknown

    Noun

    (es)
  • (music) The perceived frequency of a sound or note.
  • The pitch of middle "C" is familiar to many musicians.
  • (music) In an a cappella group, the singer responsible for singing a note for the other members to tune themselves by.
  • Bob, our pitch , let out a clear middle "C" and our conductor gave the signal to start.

    Verb

    (es)
  • To produce a note of a given pitch.
  • To fix or set the tone of.
  • to pitch a tune

    References

    * * Notes:

    course

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sequence of events.
  • # A normal or customary sequence.
  • #* Shakespeare
  • The course of true love never did run smooth.
  • #* Milton
  • Day and night, / Seedtime and harvest, heat and hoary frost, / Shall hold their course .
  • # A programme, a chosen manner of proceeding.
  • # Any ordered process or sequence or steps.
  • # A learning program, as in a school.
  • #* 1661 , , The Life of the most learned, reverend and pious Dr. H. Hammond
  • During the whole time of his abode in the university he generally spent thirteen hours of the day in study; by which assiduity besides an exact dispatch of the whole course of philosophy, he read over in a manner all classic authors that are extant
  • #* {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The attack of the MOOCs , passage=Since the launch early last year of […] two Silicon Valley start-ups offering free education through MOOCs, massive open online courses , the ivory towers of academia have been shaken to their foundations. University brands built in some cases over centuries have been forced to contemplate the possibility that information technology will rapidly make their existing business model obsolete.}}
  • # A treatment plan.
  • # A stage of a meal.
  • # The succession of one to another in office or duty; order; turn.
  • #* Bible, 2 Chron. viii. 14
  • He appointed the courses of the priests.
  • A path that something or someone moves along.
  • # The itinerary of a race.
  • # A racecourse.
  • # The path taken by a flow of water; a watercourse.
  • # (sports) The trajectory of a ball, frisbee etc.
  • # (golf) A golf course.
  • # (nautical) The direction of movement of a vessel at any given moment.
  • # (navigation) The intended passage of voyage, such as a boat, ship, airplane, spaceship, etc.
  • (nautical) The lowest square sail in a fully rigged mast, often named according to the mast.
  • .
  • A row or file of objects.
  • # (masonry) A row of bricks or blocks.
  • # (roofing) A row of material that forms the roofing, waterproofing or flashing system.
  • # (textiles) In weft knitting, a single row of loops connecting the loops of the preceding and following rows.
  • (music) A string on a lute.
  • (music) A pair of strings played together in some musical instruments, like the vihuela.
  • Derived terms

    * bird course * courseless * courselike * crash course * due course * let nature take its course * massive open online course (MOOC) * of course * off course * on course

    Verb

  • To run or flow (especially of liquids and more particularly blood).
  • The oil coursed through the engine.
    Blood pumped around the human body courses throughout all its veins and arteries.
  • * 2013 , Martina Hyde, Is the pope Catholic?'' (in ''The Guardian , 20 September 2013)[http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/sep/20/is-pope-catholic-atheists-gay-people-abortion]
  • He is a South American, so perhaps revolutionary spirit courses through Francis's veins. But what, pray, does the Catholic church want with doubt?
  • To run through or over.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • The bounding steed courses the dusty plain.
  • To pursue by tracking or estimating the course taken by one's prey; to follow or chase after.
  • * Shakespeare
  • We coursed him at the heels.
  • To cause to chase after or pursue game.
  • to course greyhounds after deer

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (colloquial)
  • Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----