Ripped vs Pipped - What's the difference?

ripped | pipped |


As verbs the difference between ripped and pipped

is that ripped is (rip) while pipped is (pip).

As an adjective ripped

is torn, either partly or into separate pieces.

ripped

English

Verb

(head)
  • (rip)
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Torn, either partly or into separate pieces.
  • Pulled away from forcefully.
  • In data storage, transferred to a hard disk from another portable media form.
  • Copied or stolen usually from an identified source.
  • (bodybuilding) Having extremely low bodyfat content so that the shape of the underlying muscles become pronounced. Said especially of well-defined abdominal muscles.
  • * 1988', Steve Holman, "Christian Conquers Columbus", '''' ' 47 (6): 28-34.
  • With the average male competitor weighing around 220, the total poundage of raw, ripped mass in the preliminary lineup is over 3,700 pounds.
  • * 2010', Bill Geiger, "6-pack Abs in 9 Weeks", ''Reps!'' ' 17 :106
  • That's the premise of the overload principle, and it must be applied, even to ab training, if you're going to develop a cut, ripped midsection.
  • (slang) Drunk, inebriated.
  • Synonyms

    * (torn) torn * (having low bodyfat) chiseled, cut, shredded * (drunk) See

    Anagrams

    *

    pipped

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (pip)

  • pip

    English

    (pip)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) pippe, from Middle (etyl) pip, from post-classical (etyl) pipita, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Any of various respiratory diseases in birds, especially infectious coryza.
  • (humorous) Of humans, a disease, malaise or depression.
  • * , letter to Edward Garnett
  • I've got the pip horribly at present.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1960 , author= , title=(Jeeves in the Offing) , section=chapter IV , passage=With this deal Uncle Tom's got on with Homer Cream, it would be fatal to risk giving [Mrs Cream] the pip in any way.}}
    Derived terms
    * like a chicken with the pip

    Etymology 2

    Apparently representing a shortened form of pippin, from (etyl) pipin, from (etyl) ).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A pippin.
  • A seed inside certain fleshy fruits (compare stone/pit), such as a peach, orange, or apple.
  • (US, colloquial) Something or someone excellent, of high quality.
  • * 2006 , Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day , Vintage 2007, p. 612:
  • She sure is a pip , that one. You need company?
  • (British, dated, WW I, signalese) P in (RAF phonetic alphabet)
  • Derived terms
    * pip emma

    Etymology 3

    Origin uncertain, perhaps related to Etymology 2, above.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One of the spots or symbols on a playing card, domino, die, etc.
  • (military, public service) One of the stars worn on the shoulder of a uniform to denote rank, e.g. of a soldier or a fireman.
  • A spot; a speck.
  • A spot of light or an inverted V indicative of a return of radar waves reflected from an object; a blip.
  • A piece of rhizome with a dormant shoot of the lily of the valley plant, used for propagation
  • Synonyms
    * (symbol on playing card etc) spot

    Verb

  • To get the better of; to defeat
  • He led throughout the race but was pipped at the post.
  • To hit with a gunshot
  • The hunter managed to pip three ducks from his blind.

    Etymology 4

    Imitative.

    Verb

  • To peep, to chirp
  • (avian biology) To make the initial hole during the process of hatching from an egg
  • Etymology 5

    Imitative.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One of a series of very short, electronically produced tones, used, for example, to count down the final few seconds before a given time or to indicate that a caller using a payphone needs to make further payment if he is to continue his call.
  • Synonyms
    * (sense) stroke

    Etymology 6

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (finance, currency trading) The smallest price increment between two currencies in foreign exchange (forex) trading.
  • Anagrams

    * English palindromes ----