Settle vs Pioneer - What's the difference?

settle | pioneer |


As verbs the difference between settle and pioneer

is that settle is to place in a fixed or permanent condition; to make firm, steady, or stable; to establish; to fix; especially, to establish in life; to fix in business, in a home etc while pioneer is to go before and prepare or open a way for; to act as pioneer.

As nouns the difference between settle and pioneer

is that settle is (archaic) a seat of any kind while pioneer is one who goes before, as into the wilderness, preparing the way for others to follow.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

settle

English

(Webster 1913)

Verb

(settl)
  • To place in a fixed or permanent condition; to make firm, steady, or stable; to establish; to fix; especially, to establish in life; to fix in business, in a home etc.
  • * And he settled his countenance steadfastly upon him,until he was ashamed. --2 Kings VIII. 11. (Rev. Ver.)
  • *
  • (transitive, obsolete, US) To establish in the pastoral office; to ordain or install as pastor or rector of a church, society, or parish.
  • To cause to be no longer in a disturbed condition; to quieten; to still; to calm; to compose.
  • * (George Chapman)
  • God settled then the huge whale-bearing lake.
  • * (John Bunyan)
  • Hoping that sleep might settle his brains.
  • To clear or purify (a liquid) of dregs and impurities by causing them to sink
  • To restore (ground, roads etc.) or bring to a smooth, dry, or passable condition
  • To cause to sink; to lower
  • To determine, as something which is exposed to doubt or question; to free from uncertainty
  • * (Jonathan Swift)
  • It will settle the wavering, and confirm the doubtful.
  • To pacify (a discussion, quarrel).
  • (archaic) To adjust (accounts); to liquidate; to balance.
  • (colloquial) To pay.
  • to settle a bill
  • To colonize; to move people to (a land or territory).
  • To become fixed, permanent or stationary; to establish one's self or itself
  • * (Francis Bacon)
  • The wind came about and settled in the west.
  • * (John Arbuthnot)
  • Chyleruns through all the intermediate colors until it settles in an intense red.
  • To fix one's residence; to establish a dwelling place or home.
  • To become married, or a householder.
  • * (Matthew Prior)
  • As people marry now and settle .
  • To be established in a profession or in employment.
  • To become firm, dry, and hard, like the ground after the effects of rain or frost have disappeared.
  • To become clear after being unclear or vague
  • * (Joseph Addison)
  • A government, on such occasions, is always thick before it settles .
  • To sink to the bottom of a body of liquid, for example dregs of a liquid, or the sediment of a reservoir.
  • To sink gradually to a lower level; to subside, for example the foundation of a house, etc.
  • To become calm; to stop being agitated
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • Till the fury of his highness settle , Come not before him.
  • To adjust differences or accounts; to come to an agreement.
  • (obsolete) To make a jointure for a wife.
  • * (Samuel Garth)
  • He sighs with most success that settles well.

    Synonyms

    * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l)

    Antonyms

    * (to place in a fixed or permanent condition) remove * (l) * (l) * (l)

    Derived terms

    * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (archaic) A seat of any kind.
  • * Hampole
  • upon the settle of his majesty
  • A long bench, often with a high back and arms, with storage space underneath for linen.
  • (obsolete) A place made lower than the rest; a wide step or platform lower than some other part.
  • * Bible, Ezekiel xliii. 14
  • And from the bottom upon the ground, even to the lower settle , shall be two cubits, and the breadth one cubit.

    pioneer

    English

    (Webster 1913)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who goes before, as into the wilderness, preparing the way for others to follow.
  • A person or other entity who is first or among the earliest in any field of inquiry, enterprise, or progress.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-05-10
  • , author=Audrey Garric , title=Urban canopies let nature bloom , volume=188, issue=22, page=30 , magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) citation , passage=As towns continue to grow, replanting vegetation has become a form of urban utopia and green roofs are spreading fast. Last year 1m square metres of plant-covered roofing was built in France, as much as in the US, and 10 times more than in Germany, the pioneer in this field.}}
    Some people will consider their national heroes to be pioneers of civilization.
    Certain politicians can be considered as pioneers of reform.
  • (obsolete, military)   A soldier detailed or employed to form roads, dig trenches, and make bridges, as an army advances; a sapper.
  • A member of any of several European organizations advocating abstinence from alcohol.
  • (Communism)   A child of 10–16 years in the former Soviet Union, in the second of the three stages in becoming a member of the Communist Party.
  • Derived terms

    * pioneer axon * Pioneer Day

    See also

    * (Pioneer movement)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To go before and prepare or open a way for; to act as pioneer.
  • Synonyms

    * push the envelope * break new ground