Pinker vs Pinkier - What's the difference?

pinker | pinkier |


As adjectives the difference between pinker and pinkier

is that pinker is (pink) while pinkier is (pinky).

pinker

English

Adjective

(head)
  • (pink)
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    pink

    English

    (wikipedia pink)

    Etymology 1

    Origin unknown.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (regional) The common minnow,
  • (regional) A young Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar , before it becomes a smolt; a parr.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) pincke.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Etymology 3

    Probably from Low Dutch or Low German; compare Low German pinken ‘hit, peck’.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To decorate a piece of clothing or fabric by adding holes or by scalloping the fringe.
  • To prick with a sword.
  • * 1749 , Henry Fielding, Tom Jones , Folio Society 1973, p. 642:
  • ‘Pugh!’ says she, ‘you have pinked a man in a duel, that's all.’
  • To wound by irony, criticism, or ridicule.
  • To choose; to cull; to pick out.
  • (Herbert)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A stab.
  • (Grose)

    Etymology 4

    Origin unknown; perhaps from the notion of the petals being pinked (Etymology 3, above).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Any of various flowers in the genus Dianthus , sometimes called carnations.
  • This garden in particular has a beautiful bed of pinks .
  • (dated) A perfect example; excellence, perfection; the embodiment (of) some quality.
  • Your hat, madam, is the very pink of fashion.
  • * Shakespeare
  • the very pink of courtesy
  • The colour of this flower, between red and white; pale red.
  • My new dress is a wonderful shade of pink .
  • Hunting pink; scarlet, as worn by hunters.
  • *1928 , (Siegfried Sassoon), Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man , Penguin 2013, p. 23:
  • *:I had taken it for granted that there would be people ‘in pink ’, but these enormous confident strangers overwhelmed me with the visible authenticity of their brick-red coats.
  • * 1986 , Michael J O'Shea, James Joyce and Heraldry , SUNY, page 69:
  • it is interesting to note the curious legend that the pink of the hunting field is not due to any optical advantage but to an entirely different reason.
  • (snooker) One of the colour balls used in snooker, with a value of 6 points.
  • Oh dear, he's left himself snookered behind the pink .
  • (slang) An unlettered and uncultured, but relatively prosperous, member of the middle classes; compare babbitt'', ''bourgeoisie .
  • See also

    *

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Having a colour between red and white; pale red.
  • Of a fox-hunter's jacket: scarlet.
  • Having conjunctivitis.
  • (obsolete) By comparison to red (communist), describing someone who sympathizes with the ideals of communism without actually being a Russian-style communist: a pinko.
  • * 1976 : Bhalchandra Pundlik Adarkar, The Future of the Constitution: A Critical Analysis
  • The word "socialist" has so many connotations that it can cover almost anything from pink liberalism to red-red communism.
  • (informal) Relating to women or girls.
  • pink-collar; pink job
  • (informal) Relating to homosexuals as a group within society.
  • the pink economy
    pink dollar; pink pound
    Derived terms
    * clove pink * fire pink * hunting pink * in the pink * moss pink * parlor pink, parlour pink * pink bits * pink-collar * pink dollar * pink elephants * pink gin * pinkification * pink lady * pink pound * pink salmon * pink slip * pink snapper * pinkie * pinking shears * pinko * pink of health * pinky * salmon pink * sea pink * shell pink * shocking pink * strike me pink * swamp pink * tickle pink * wild pink

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To turn (a topaz or other gemstone) pink by the application of heat.
  • Etymology 5

    Onomatopoeic

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (of a motor car) To emit a high "pinking" noise, usually as a result of ill-set ignition timing for the fuel used (in a spark ignition engine).
  • Etymology 6

    (etyl) pinken.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To wink; to blink.
  • (rfquotek, L'Estrange)

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Half-shut; winking.
  • (Shakespeare)
    1000 English basic words ----

    pinkier

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (pinky)

  • pinky

    English

    Etymology 1

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Pinkish.
  • * Edward Lear, , 1871:
  • In a pinky paper all folded neat,
    And they fastened it down with a pin.

    Noun

    (pinkies)
  • (uncountable, historical, slang, Australia) Methylated spirits mixed with red wine or Condy's crystals.
  • * 2006 , Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day , Vintage 2007, p. 262:
  • “Here,” Nigel greeted him, “do try a spot of ‘pinky ,’ it's ever so much fun, really.”
  • A baby mouse, especially when used as food for a snake, etc.
  • (offensive, slang, ethnic slur) A white person.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) pinkje

    Noun

    (pinkies)
  • The smallest finger or toe of a hand or foot.
  • * 2003 , Billoo Badhshah, The Unofficial Joke Book Of Australia , page 126,
  • Everyday as he passes them, the hookers wave at him with their pinkies and say, “Hi there, little boy!”
    Alternative forms
    * pinkie
    Derived terms
    * pinky ring, pinky swear/pinky-swear, pinky promise/pinky-promise
    Synonyms
    * (smallest finger or toe) little finger, pinky finger, pinky toe, little piggy, digit V, fifth digit (-)

    See also

    * (wikipedia) English ethnic slurs