Pinch vs Walk - What's the difference?

pinch | walk | Synonyms |

Pinch is a synonym of walk.


As verbs the difference between pinch and walk

is that pinch is to squeeze a small amount of a person's skin and flesh, making it hurt while walk is to move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times compare run .

As nouns the difference between pinch and walk

is that pinch is the action of squeezing a small amount of a person's skin and flesh, making it hurt while walk is a trip made by walking.

pinch

English

Verb

(es)
  • To squeeze a small amount of a person's skin and flesh, making it hurt.
  • The children were scolded for pinching each other.
    This shoe pinches my foot.
  • To steal, usually of something almost trivial or inconsequential.
  • Someone has pinched my handkerchief!
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=May 13 , author=Alistair Magowan , title=Sunderland 0-1 Man Utd , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Then, as the Sunderland fans' cheers bellowed around the stadium, United's title bid was over when it became apparent City had pinched a last-gasp winner to seal their first title in 44 years.}}
  • (slang) To arrest or capture.
  • (horticulture) To cut shoots]] or [[bud, buds of a plant in order to shape the plant, or to improve its yield.
  • (nautical) To sail so close-hauled that the sails begin to flutter.
  • (hunting) To take hold; to grip, as a dog does.
  • (obsolete) To be niggardly or covetous.
  • (Gower)
  • * Franklin
  • the wretch whom avarice bids to pinch and spare
  • To seize; to grip; to bite; said of animals.
  • * Chapman
  • He [the hound] pinched and pulled her down.
  • (figurative) To cramp; to straiten; to oppress; to starve.
  • to be pinched for money
  • * Sir Walter Raleigh
  • want of room pinching a whole nation
  • To move, as a railroad car, by prying the wheels with a pinch.
  • Noun

    (es)
  • The action of squeezing a small amount of a person's skin and flesh, making it hurt.
  • A small amount of powder or granules, such that the amount could be held between fingertip and thumb tip.
  • An awkward situation of some kind (especially money or social) which is difficult to escape.
  • * 1955 , edition, ISBN 0553249592, page 171:
  • It took nerve and muscle both to carry the body out and down the stairs to the lower hall, but he damn well had to get it out of his place and away from his door, and any of those four could have done it in a pinch', and it sure was a ' pinch .
  • An organic herbal smoke additive.
  • Derived terms

    * feel the pinch * in a pinch * at a pinch * pinchy * take with a pinch of salt

    Descendants

    * Japanese: (pinchi)

    walk

    English

    (walk)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times. Compare .
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • *, chapter=15
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Edward Churchill still attended to his work in a hopeless mechanical manner like a sleep-walker who walks safely on a well-known round. But his Roman collar galled him, his cossack stifled him, his biretta was as uncomfortable as a merry-andrew's cap and bells.}}
  • To "walk free", i.e. to win, or avoid, a criminal court case, particularly when actually guilty.
  • :
  • Of an object, to be stolen.
  • :
  • To walk off the field, as if given out, after the fielding side appeals and before the umpire has ruled; done as a matter of sportsmanship when the batsman believes he is out.
  • (lb) To travel (a distance) by walking.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked' home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He ' walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • (lb) To take for a walk or accompany on a walk.
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I will rather trusta thief to walk my ambling gelding.
  • To allow a batter to reach base by pitching four balls.
  • (lb) To move something by shifting between two positions, as if it were walking.
  • :
  • (lb) To full; to beat cloth to give it the consistency of felt.
  • (lb) To traverse by walking (or analogous gradual movement).
  • :
  • To leave, resign.
  • :
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:He will make their cows and garrans to walk .
  • (lb) To push (a vehicle) alongside oneself as one walks.
  • *1994 , John Forester, Bicycle Transportation: A Handbook for Cycling Transportation Engineers , MIT Press, p.245:
  • *:The county had a successful defense only because the judge kept telling the jury at every chance that the cyclist should have walked his bicycle like a pedestrian.
  • To behave; to pursue a course of life; to conduct oneself.
  • *(Jeremy Taylor) (1613–1677)
  • *:We walk' perversely with God, and he will ' walk crookedly toward us.
  • To be stirring; to be abroad; to go restlessly about; said of things or persons expected to remain quiet, such as a sleeping person, or the spirit of a dead person.
  • *(Hugh Latimer) (c.1485-1555)
  • *:I heard a pen walking in the chimney behind the cloth.
  • (lb) To be in motion; to act; to move.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:Her tongue did walk in foul reproach.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I have heard, but not believed, the spirits of the dead / May walk again.
  • *(Ben Jonson) (1572-1637)
  • *:Do you think I'd walk in any plot?
  • Conjugation

    (en-conj-simple)

    Synonyms

    * (move upon two feet) - See also * be acquitted, get off, go free * (be stolen) be/get stolen; (British) be/get nicked, be/get pinched * (beat cloth) full, waulk (obsolete)

    Derived terms

    * walkathon * walker * Walker * walkies * walk away from * walk away with * walk in * walk in circles * walk into * walk it * walk it off * walk like an Egyptian * walk off * walk off with * walk on * walk on the wild side * walk out * walk over * walk through * walkie-talkie * walkman * Walkman * walkover * walk tall * walk the beat * walk the walk

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A trip made by walking.
  • I take a walk every morning
  • A distance walked.
  • It’s a long walk from my house to the library
  • (sports) An Olympic Games track event requiring that the heel of the leading foot touch the ground before the toe of the trailing foot leaves the ground.
  • A manner of walking; a person's style of walking.
  • The Ministry of Silly Walks is underfunded this year
  • A path, sidewalk/pavement or other maintained place on which to walk. Compare trail .
  • (baseball) An award of first base to a batter following four balls being thrown by the pitcher; known in the rules as a "base on balls".
  • The pitcher now has two walks in this inning alone

    Synonyms

    * (trip made by walking) stroll (slow walk), hike (long walk), trek (long walk) * (distance walked) hike (if long), trek (if long) * (manner of walking) gait * (path) footpath, path, (British) pavement, (US) sidewalk

    Derived terms

    * cakewalk * catwalk * farmer's walk * intentional walk * perp walk * race walk * random walk * sidewalk * space walk / spacewalk * sponsored walk * walk in the park * walk in the snow * walk on the wild side * walk policy * whistle walk