Baby vs Pet - What's the difference?

baby | pet |


As a noun baby

is baby (infant).

As an acronym pet is

(organic compound) polyethylene terephthalate.

baby

English

Noun

(babies)
  • A very young human, particularly from birth to a couple of years old or until walking is fully mastered.
  • Any very young animal, especially a vertebrate; many species have specific names for their babies, such as kittens for the babies of cats, puppies]] for the babies of dogs, and chicks for the babies of birds. See [[:Category:Baby animals for more.
  • Unborn young; a fetus.
  • When is your baby due?
  • A person who is immature or infantile.
  • Stand up for yourself - don't be such a baby !
  • A term of endearment for a girlfriend or boyfriend or spouse.
  • (informal) A form of address to a man or a woman considered to be attractive.
  • Hey baby , what are you doing later?
  • A pet project or responsibility.
  • The annual report has been my baby since September.
  • The lastborn of a family.
  • See my new car here? I can't wait to take this baby for a drive.
  • (archaic) A small image of an infant; a doll.
  • Synonyms

    * (young human being) babe, babby, babbie, infant * (immature or infantile person) big baby * (term of endearment) love

    See also

    * gamete, zygote, morula, blastocyst, embryo, fetus

    Adjective

    (-) (used only before the noun)
  • Of a child: very young; of the age when he or she would be termed a baby or infant.
  • a baby boy
  • Of an animal: young.
  • a baby elephant
  • Intended for babies.
  • baby clothes
  • Picked when small and immature (as in baby corn'', ''baby potatoes ).
  • Usage notes

    When referring to a human baby (as per noun sense 1 above) the usual practice is to treat 'human' as the adjective and 'baby' as the noun.

    Synonyms

    * (sense) little * (intended for babies) baby's

    Verb

  • To coddle; to pamper somebody like an infant.
  • Derived terms

    * anchor baby * baby-batterer * baby-battering * baby beef * Baby Bell * baby bond * baby bonus * baby boom * baby boomer * baby-bouncer * baby boy * baby buggy * babycare * baby carriage * baby doll * baby-doll pajamas, baby doll pyjamas * baby face * baby food * baby girl * baby grand * babygro * babyhood * baby house * babyish * baby-jumper * baby-minder * baby monitor * baby of the family * baby's breath * baby seat * babysit, baby-sit * babysitter, baby-sitter * babysitting * baby-sitting * baby-snatcher * baby-snatching * baby's tears * baby talk * baby tooth * baby-walker * be left holding the baby * big baby * crybaby * cry like a baby * passport baby * throw out the baby with the bathwater, throw the baby out with the bathwater * sleep like a baby (baby)

    See also

    * child * infant * toddler

    pet

    English

    Etymology 1

    Attested since the 1500s in the sense "indulged child" and since the 1530s in the sense "animal companion"..'>citation The verb is derived from the noun.

    Noun

    (wikipedia pet) {{ picdic , image=Pudel miniatura 342.jpg , detail1= }} (en noun)
  • An animal kept as a companion.
  • One who is excessively loyal to a superior.
  • Any person or animal especially cherished and indulged; a darling.
  • * Tatler
  • the love of cronies, pets , and favourites
    Synonyms
    * companion animal

    References

    Verb

    (pett)
  • To stroke or fondle (an animal).
  • (informal) To stroke or fondle (another person) amorously.
  • (informal) Of two or more people, to stroke and fondle one another amorously.
  • (dated) To treat as a pet; to fondle; to indulge.
  • His daughter was petted and spoiled.
  • (archaic) To be a pet.
  • (Feltham)
    Derived terms
    * pet cemetery * pet name * pet peeve * pet project * pet shop * pet store * petting * teacher's pet

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Favourite; cherished.
  • a pet child
    a pet theory
  • * F. Harrison
  • Some young lady's pet curate.

    Etymology 2

    .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A fit of petulance, a sulk, arising from the impression that one has been offended or slighted.
  • * 1891 , Mary Noailles Murfree, In the "Stranger People's" Country , Nebraska 2005, p. 105:
  • There was something ludicrous, even more, unbecoming a gentleman, in leaving a friend's house in a pet , with the host's reproaches sounding in his ears, to be matched only by the bitterness of the guest's sneering retorts.

    Etymology 3

    .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Etymology 4

    .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Geordie) A term of endearment usually applied to women and children.
  • References

    *

    Anagrams

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