Peel vs Bark - What's the difference?

peel | bark |


In context|obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between peel and bark

is that peel is (obsolete) a fence made of stakes; a stockade while bark is (obsolete) a small sailing vessel, eg a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.

As verbs the difference between peel and bark

is that peel is (archaic|transitive) to plunder; to pillage, rob or peel can be (croquet) to send through a hoop (of a ball other than one's own) or peel can be : to sound loudly while bark is to make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs) or bark can be to strip the bark from; to peel.

As nouns the difference between peel and bark

is that peel is the skin or outer layer of a fruit, vegetable etc (usually (uncountable)) or peel can be (obsolete) a stake or peel can be a shovel or similar instrument, now especially a pole with a flat disc at the end used for removing loaves of bread from a baker's oven or peel can be (scotland|and|curling) an equal or match; a draw while bark is the short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog or bark can be (countable|uncountable) the exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree or bark can be (obsolete) a small sailing vessel, eg a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.

peel

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) .

Verb

(en verb)
  • To remove the skin or outer covering of.
  • I sat by my sister's bed, peeling oranges for her.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The skillful shepherd peeled me certain wands.
  • To remove from the outer or top layer of.
  • I peeled (the skin from) an orange and ate it hungrily.
    We peeled the old wallpaper off in strips where it was hanging loose.
  • To become detached, come away, especially in flakes or strips; to shed skin in such a way.
  • I had been out in the sun too long, and my nose was starting to peel .
  • To remove one's clothing.
  • The children peeled by the side of the lake and jumped in.
  • To move, separate (off or away)
  • The scrum-half peeled off and made for the touchlines.
    Synonyms
    * (remove outer covering) skin, strip * (remove clothing) disrobe, strip
    Derived terms
    * peel off * peel out * keep one's eyes peeled (i.e. with eyelids open) * peeler

    Noun

  • The skin or outer layer of a fruit, vegetable, etc.
  • The action of peeling away from a formation.
  • (label) cosmetic preparation designed to remove dead skin or exfoliate.
  • Synonyms
    * (skin of a fruit) rind, zest
    Derived terms
    * orange peel * peel strength

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) and (etyl) pel (compare modern French pieu), from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A stake.
  • (obsolete) A fence made of stakes; a stockade.
  • (archaic) A small tower, fort, or castle; a keep.
  • Derived terms
    * peel-house, peelhouse * peel-tower

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) pele (compare modern (pelle)), from (etyl) pala, from the base of .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A shovel or similar instrument, now especially a pole with a flat disc at the end used for removing loaves of bread from a baker's oven.
  • A T-shaped implement used by printers and bookbinders for hanging wet sheets of paper on lines or poles to dry.
  • (archaic, US) The blade of an oar.
  • Etymology 4

    Origin unknown.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Scotland, and, curling) An equal or match; a draw.
  • (curling) A takeout which removes a stone from play as well as the delivered stone.
  • Etymology 5

    Named from Walter H. Peel, a noted 19th-century croquet player.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (croquet) To send through a hoop (of a ball other than one's own).
  • Etymology 6

    Misspelling of peal.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • : to sound loudly.
  • * 1825 June 25, "My Village Bells", in The Circulator of Useful Knowledge, Literature, Amusement, and General Information'' number XXVI, available in, 1825, ''The Circulator of Useful Amusement, Literature, Science, and General Information , page 401,
  • Oh ! still for me let merry bells peel out their holy chime;
  • * 1901 January 1, "Twentieth Century's Triumphant Entry", , page 1,
  • The lights flashed, the crowds sang,... bells peeled , bombs thundered,... and the new Century made its triumphant entry.
  • * 2006 , Miles Richardson, Being-In-Christ and Putting Death in Its Place , , ISBN 0807132047, pages 230–231,
  • As the tiny Virgin... approaches one of the barrio churches, bells peel vigorously, a brass band launches into a fast-paced tune, and large rockets zoom... .

    Etymology 7

    (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (archaic) To plunder; to pillage, rob.
  • * Milton
  • But govern ill the nations under yoke, / Peeling their provinces.

    bark

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) barken, berken, borken, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs).
  • The neighbour's dog is always barking .
    The seal barked as the zookeeper threw fish into its enclosure.
  • To make a clamor; to make importunate outcries.
  • * (rfdate), Tyndale.
  • They bark , and say the Scripture maketh heretics.
  • * (rfdate), Fuller
  • Where there is the barking of the belly, there no other commands will be heard, much less obeyed. .
  • To speak sharply.
  • The sergeant barked an order.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011
  • , date=January 5 , author=Mark Ashenden , title=Wolverhampton 1 - 0 Chelsea , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=While McCarthy prowled the touchline barking orders, his opposite number watched on motionless and expressionless and, with 25 minutes to go, decided to throw on Nicolas Anelka for Kalou.}}
    Usage notes
    Historically, bork'' existed as a past tense form and ''borken as a past participle, but both forms are now obsolete.
    Derived terms
    * bark up the wrong tree * barking * barking dogs never bite * bebark * dogs bark *
    Synonyms
    * latrate (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog.
  • A similar sound made by some other animals.
  • (figuratively) An abrupt loud vocal utterance.
  • * circa 1921 , The Cambridge History of English and American Literature , vol 11:
  • Fox’s clumsy figure, negligently dressed in blue and buff, seemed unprepossessing; only his shaggy eyebrows added to the expression of his face; his voice would rise to a bark in excitement.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) bark, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (wikipedia bark)
  • (countable, uncountable) The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree.
  • * '>citation
  • Moving about 70 miles per hour, it crashed through the sturdy old-growth trees, snapping their limbs and shredding bark from their trunks.
  • (medicine) Peruvian bark or Jesuit's bark, the bark of the cinchona from which quinine is produced.
  • The crust formed on barbecued meat that has had a rub applied to it.
  • * 2009 , Julie Reinhardt, She-Smoke: A Backyard Barbecue Book , page 151:
  • This softens the meat further, but at some loss of crunch to the bark .
    Usage notes
    Usually uncountable; bark may be countable when referring to the barks of different types of tree.
    Synonyms
    * (exterior covering of a tree) rind

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To strip the bark from; to peel.
  • To abrade or rub off any outer covering from.
  • to bark one’s heel
  • To girdle.
  • To cover or inclose with bark, or as with bark.
  • bark the roof of a hut

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) , from Egyptian b?re .

    Alternative forms

    * barque

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A small sailing vessel, e.g. a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.
  • (poetic) a sailing vessel or boat of any kind.
  • * circa 1609 , William Shakespeare, Sonnet 116:
  • It is the star to every wandering bark
  • * circa 1880 , among the Poems of Emily Dickinson:
  • Whether my bark went down at sea, Whether she met with gales,
  • (nautical) A three-masted vessel, having her foremast and mainmast square-rigged, and her mizzenmast schooner-rigged.