Petrol vs Patrol - What's the difference?

petrol | patrol |


As nouns the difference between petrol and patrol

is that petrol is (chiefly|au|nz|uk) petroleum, a fluid consisting of a mixture of refined petroleum hydrocarbons, primarily consisting of octane, commonly used as a motor fuel while patrol is (military) a going of the rounds along the chain of sentinels and between the posts, by a guard, usually consisting of three or four men, to insure greater security from attacks on the outposts.

As a verb patrol is

to go the rounds along a chain of sentinels; to traverse a police district or beat.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

petrol

English

(wikipedia petrol)

Noun

(-)
  • (chiefly, AU, NZ, UK) Petroleum, a fluid consisting of a mixture of refined petroleum hydrocarbons, primarily consisting of octane, commonly used as a motor fuel.
  • * 1987 October 29, Advertisement, , page 31,
  • We were the first company to introduce unleaded petrol in Britain, opening our first pump in June 1986.
  • * 2000 September 27, Congressional Record: Proceedings and Debates of the 106th Congress, Second Session , Volume 146, Part 14, page 19605,
  • European oil firms are beginning to follow the example of their American counterparts by adding convenience stores to their pumps: the typical American petrol station now makes some 40 percent of its profits from the sale of non-oil products, such as cigarettes and beer.
  • * 2003 , S. Srinivasan, Automotive Mechanics , Tata McGraw Hill, India, 2nd Edition, page 149,
  • At a crank angle 6° before the TDC, the electric spark ignites the petrol mixture.
  • * 2006 February 10, Kenya Gazette , page 354,
  • He also admitted that when big trucks bring in petrol , they park along Langata Road.
  • * 2006 August, Economic Scenario'', '' , page 218,
  • The increase in rates comes just a few days after India raised petrol prices by 9-2% and diesel prices by 6-6% which boosed inflation expectations in Indian economy.
  • * 2008 , Robin Stonecash, Joshua Gans, Stephen King, Gregory Mankiw, Principles of Macroeconomics , Cengage Learning Australia, page 122,
  • Most major Australian cities receive their petrol from a single refinery.

    Synonyms

    * (US) gasoline, gas

    Derived terms

    * petrol bomb * petrol station * petrol tank

    See also

    * diesel * kerosene * leaded * lead-free * paraffin * petroil * unleaded

    patrol

    English

    (Webster 1913)

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (obsolete)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) patrouille, from (etyl) patrouille, . Related to (l), (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (military) A going of the rounds along the chain of sentinels and between the posts, by a guard, usually consisting of three or four men, to insure greater security from attacks on the outposts.
  • (military) A movement, by a small body of troops beyond the line of outposts, to explore the country and gain intelligence of the enemy's whereabouts.
  • (military) The guard or men who go the rounds for observation; a detachment whose duty it is to patrol.
  • Any perambulation of a particular line or district to guard it; also, the men thus guarding; as, a customs patrol; a fire patrol.
  • * (rfdate) A. Hamilton:
  • In France there is an army of patrols to secure her fiscal regulations.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-24, volume=408, issue=8850, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Boots on the street , passage=Philadelphia’s foot-patrol' strategy was developed after a study in 2009 by criminologists from Temple University, which is in the 22nd district. A randomised trial overturned the conventional view that foot ' patrols make locals like the police more and fear crime less, but do not actually reduce crime. In targeted areas, violent crime decreased by 23%.}}
  • (Scouting) A unit of a troop, typically composed of around eight boys.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) patrouiller, from (etyl)

    Verb

    (patroll)
  • To go the rounds along a chain of sentinels; to traverse a police district or beat.
  • To go the rounds of, as a sentry, guard, or policeman; as, to patrol a frontier; to patrol a beat.
  • Anagrams

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