Pasture vs Haft - What's the difference?

pasture | haft |


As nouns the difference between pasture and haft

is that pasture is land on which cattle can be kept for feeding while haft is the handle of a tool or weapon or haft can be (northern english dialect) a piece of mountain pasture to which a farm animal has become hefted.

As verbs the difference between pasture and haft

is that pasture is to move animals into a to graze while haft is to fit a handle to a tool or weapon.

pasture

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • Land on which cattle can be kept for feeding.
  • Ground covered with grass or herbage, used or suitable for the grazing of livestock.
  • * Bible, Psalms xxiii. 2
  • He maketh me to lie down in green pastures .
  • * Shakespeare
  • So graze as you find pasture .
  • (obsolete) Food, nourishment.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , III.x:
  • Ne euer is he wont on ought to feed, / But toades and frogs, his pasture poysonous [...].

    Derived terms

    * pasture rose * pasture thistle

    Verb

  • To move animals into a to graze.
  • To graze.
  • To feed, especially on growing grass; to supply grass as food for.
  • The farmer pastures''' fifty oxen; the land will '''pasture forty cows.

    Anagrams

    * ----

    haft

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The handle of a tool or weapon.
  • * Dryden
  • This brandish'd dagger / I'll bury to the haft in her fair breast.
    Synonyms
    * hilt (sword handle ) * stale, stail, stele, steal (axe handle )

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To fit a handle to a tool or weapon.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    * heft

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Northern English dialect) A piece of mountain pasture to which a farm animal has become hefted.