Part vs Root - What's the difference?

part | root |


As nouns the difference between part and root

is that part is a fraction of a whole; a portion while root is the part of a plant, generally underground, that absorbs water and nutrients or root can be (australia|new zealand|vulgar|slang) an act of sexual intercourse.

As verbs the difference between part and root

is that part is to leave while root is (computing|slang|transitive) to break into a computer system and obtain root access or root can be to turn up or dig with the snout or root can be (intransitive|with for|us) to cheer to show support for.

As a adjective part

is fractional; partial.

As a adverb part

is partly; partially; fractionally.

part

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (label) A portion; a component.
  • #A fraction of a whole.
  • #:
  • #*
  • #*:Hepaticology, outside the temperate parts of the Northern Hemisphere, still lies deep in the shadow cast by that ultimate "closet taxonomist," Franz Stephani—a ghost whose shadow falls over us all.
  • #*{{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-01, volume=407, issue=8838, page=11, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Towards the end of poverty , passage=America’s poverty line is $63 a day for a family of four. In the richer parts of the emerging world $4 a day is the poverty barrier. But poverty’s scourge is fiercest below $1.25 ([…]): people below that level live lives that are poor, nasty, brutish and short.}}
  • #A distinct element.
  • #:
  • #*
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=It had been arranged as part of the day's programme that Mr. Cooke was to drive those who wished to go over the Rise in his new brake.}}
  • #*{{quote-magazine, date=2012-12-01, volume=405, issue=8813, page=3 (Technology Quarterly), magazine=(The Economist), title= An internet of airborne things
  • , passage=A farmer could place an order for a new tractor part' by text message and pay for it by mobile money-transfer. A supplier many miles away would then take the ' part to the local matternet station for airborne dispatch via drone.}}
  • #A group inside a larger group.
  • #Share, especially of a profit.
  • #:
  • #A unit of relative proportion in a mixture.
  • #:
  • #3.5 centiliters of one ingredient in a mixed drink.
  • #A section of a document.
  • #:
  • #A section of land; an area of a country or other territory; region.
  • #*1590 , (Edmund Spenser), (The Faerie Queene) , II.vi:
  • #*:the Faery knight / Besought that Damzell suffer him depart, / And yield him readie passage to that other part .
  • # A factor.
  • #:
  • Duty; responsibility.
  • :
  • #Position or role (especially in a play).
  • #:
  • #*
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=2 , passage=We drove back to the office with some concern on my part at the prospect of so large a case. Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke. He was dressed out in broad gaiters and bright tweeds, like an English tourist, and his face might have belonged to Dagon, idol of the Philistines.}}
  • #*, chapter=5
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=He was thinking; but the glory of the song, the swell from the great organ, the clustered lights,
  • #(label) The melody played or sung by a particular instrument, voice, or group of instruments or voices, within a polyphonic piece.
  • #:
  • #Each of two contrasting sides of an argument, debate etc.; "hand".
  • #*, II.15:
  • #*:the fruition of life cannot perfectly be pleasing unto us, if we stand in any feare to lose it. A man might nevertheless say on the contrary part , that we embrace and claspe this good so much the harder, and with more affection, as we perceive it to be less sure, and feare it should be taken from us.
  • #*Bible, (w), ix.40:
  • #*:He that is not against us is on our part .
  • #*(Edmund Waller) (1606-1687)
  • #*:Make whole kingdoms take her brother's part .
  • (US) The dividing line formed by combing the hair in different directions.
  • :
  • (label) In the Hebrew lunisolar calendar, a unit of time equivalent to 3? seconds. (jump)
  • A constituent of character or capacity; quality; faculty; talent; usually in the plural with a collective sense.
  • *(Edmund Burke) (1729-1797)
  • *:men of considerable parts
  • * (1800-1859)
  • *:great quickness of parts
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:which maintained so politic a state of evil, that they will not admit any good part to intermingle with them.
  • Synonyms

    * portion, component, element * faction, party * position, role * parting (UK), (l), (l)/(l) * (jump) chelek * See also

    Holonyms

    * whole

    Derived terms

    * part and parcel * part of speech

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To leave.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:He wrung Bassanio's hand, and so they parted .
  • *(Anthony Trollope) (1815-1882)
  • *:It was strange to him that a father should feel no tenderness at parting with an only son.
  • *(George Eliot) (1819-1880)
  • *:his precious bag, which he would by no means part from
  • To cut hair with a parting; shed.
  • (lb) To divide in two.
  • :
  • *1884 , (Mark Twain), (The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn), Chapter VII
  • *:I run the canoe into a deep dent in the bank that I knowed about; I had to part the willow branches to get in; and when I made fast nobody could a seen the canoe from the outside.
  • (lb) To be divided in two or separated; shed.
  • :
  • To divide up; to share.
  • *1526 , (William Tyndale), trans. (Bible) , (w) III:
  • *:He that hath ij. cootes, lett hym parte with hym that hath none: And he that hath meate, let him do lyke wyse.
  • *(Bible), (w) xix. 24
  • *:They parted my raiment among them.
  • *(Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • *:to part his throne, and share his heaven with thee
  • *, II.x:
  • *:He left three sonnes, his famous progeny, / Borne of faire Inogene of Italy; / Mongst whom he parted his imperiall state
  • (lb) To have a part or share; to partake.
  • *(Bible), 1 (w) xxx. 24
  • *:They shall part alike.
  • To separate or disunite; to remove from contact or contiguity; to sunder.
  • *(Bible), (w) xxiv. 51
  • *:While he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:The narrow seas that part / The French and English.
  • *
  • *:"A fine man, that Dunwody, yonder," commented the young captain, as they parted , and as he turned to his prisoner. "We'll see him on in Washington some day. He is strengthening his forces now against Mr. Benton out there.."
  • (lb) To hold apart; to stand or intervene between.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:The stumbling night did part our weary powers.
  • To separate by a process of extraction, elimination, or secretion.
  • :
  • *(Matthew Prior) (1664-1721)
  • *:The liver minds his own affair,/ And parts and strains the vital juices.
  • To leave; to quit.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:since presently your souls must part your bodies
  • To leave (an IRC channel).
  • *2000 , "Phantom", Re: Uhm... hi... I guess...'' (on newsgroup ''alt.support.boy-lovers )
  • *:He parted the channel saying "SHUTUP!"since then, I've been seeing him on IRC every day (really can't imagine him not being on IRC anymore actually).
  • Derived terms

    * part ways * part with

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Fractional; partial.
  • Fred was part owner of the car.

    Adverb

    (-)
  • Partly; partially; fractionally.
  • Derived terms

    * part-finance * take part

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * prat, rapt, tarp, trap 1000 English basic words ----

    root

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) ; cognate with wort and radix.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The part of a plant, generally underground, that absorbs water and nutrients.
  • This tree's roots can go as deep as twenty metres underground.
  • A root vegetable.
  • *
  • two fields which should have been sown with roots in the early summer were not sown because the ploughing had not been completed early enough.
  • The part of a tooth extending into the bone holding the tooth in place.
  • Root damage is a common problem of overbrushing.
  • The part of a hair under the skin that holds the hair in place.
  • The root is the only part of the hair that is alive.
  • The part of a hair near the skin that has not been dyed, permed, or otherwise treated.
  • He dyed his hair black last month, so the grey roots can be seen.
  • The primary source; origin.
  • The love of money is the root of all evil.
  • * John Locke
  • They were the roots out of which sprang two distinct people.
  • (arithmetic) Of a number or expression, a number which, when raised to a specified power, yields the specified number or expression.
  • The cube root of 27 is 3.
  • (arithmetic) A square root (understood if no power is specified; in which case, “the root of” is often abbreviated to “root”).
  • Multiply by root 2.
  • (analysis) A zero (of a function).
  • (graph theory, computing) The single node of a tree that has no parent.
  • (linguistic morphology) The primary lexical unit of a word, which carries the most significant aspects of semantic content and cannot be reduced into smaller constituents. Inflectional stems often derive from roots.
  • (philology) A word from which another word or words are derived.
  • (music) The fundamental tone of any chord; the tone from whose harmonics, or overtones, a chord is composed.
  • (Busby)
  • The lowest place, position, or part.
  • * Milton
  • deep to the roots of hell
  • * Southey
  • the roots of the mountains
  • (computing) In UNIX terminology, the first user account with complete access to the operating system and its configuration, found at the root of the directory structure.
  • (computing) The person who manages accounts on a UNIX system.
  • (computing) The highest directory of a directory structure which may contain both files and subdirectories. (rfex)
  • Synonyms
    * (source) basis, origin, source * (zero of a function) zero * (word from which another is derived) etymon * superuser (), root account, root user
    Antonyms
    * (zero of a function) pole
    Holonyms
    * (zero of a function) kernel
    Derived terms
    * cube root * functional root * put down roots * root canal * root cause * rootkit * roots * roots music * rootsy * square root * strictly roots * take root * taproot * root gap

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (computing, slang, transitive) To break into a computer system and obtain root access.
  • We rooted his box and planted a virus on it.
  • To fix the root; to enter the earth, as roots; to take root and begin to grow.
  • * Mortimer
  • In deep grounds the weeds root deeper.
  • * '>citation
  • To be firmly fixed; to be established.
  • * Bishop Fell
  • If any irregularity chanced to intervene and to cause misapprehensions, he gave them not leave to root and fasten by concealment.

    See also

    * (linguistics) stem

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) . Cognate with rodent. Cognate with Dutch wroeten.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To turn up or dig with the snout.
  • A pig roots the earth for truffles.
  • (by extension) To seek favour or advancement by low arts or grovelling servility; to fawn.
  • To rummage, to search as if by digging in soil.
  • rooting about in a junk-filled drawer
  • To root out; to abolish.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I will go root away the noisome weeds.
  • * Bible, Deuteronomy xxix. 28
  • The Lord rooted them out of their land and cast them into another land.
  • (Australia, New Zealand, vulgar, slang) To have sexual intercourse.
  • Usage notes
    * The Australian/New Zealand sexual sense is somewhat milder than fuck but still quite coarse, certainly not for polite conversation. The sexual sense will often be understood, unless care is taken with the context to make the rummage sense clear, or 'root through' or 'root around' is used. The past participle rooted'' is equivalent to ''fucked'' in the figurative sense of broken or tired, but ''rooting'' is only the direct verbal sense, not an all-purpose intensive like ''fucking .
    Synonyms
    * (rummage) dig out, root out, rummage * (have sexual intercourse) screw, bang, drill (US), shag (British) - See also
    Derived terms
    * root about * rooted * root out * root up

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Australia, New Zealand, vulgar, slang) An act of sexual intercourse.
  • Fancy a root ?
  • (Australia, New Zealand, vulgar, slang) A sexual partner.
  • Usage notes
    * The Australian/New Zealand sexual sense of root'' is somewhat milder than ''fuck'' but still quite coarse, certainly not for polite conversation. The normal usage is ''to have a root or similar.
    Synonyms
    * (act of sexual intercourse) screw (qualifier), shag (UK); see also * (sexual partner) screw (US)

    Etymology 3

    Possibly an alteration of , influenced by hoot

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (intransitive, with for, US) To cheer to show support for.
  • * 1908 ,
  • Let me root', '''root''', ' root for the home team,
  • (US) To hope for the success of. Rendered as 'root for'.
  • I'm rooting for you, don't let me down!
    Synonyms
    * (cheer) barrack (qualifier), cheer on

    Anagrams

    * ----