Paroxysm vs Pang - What's the difference?

paroxysm | pang |


As nouns the difference between paroxysm and pang

is that paroxysm is a random or sudden outburst (of activity) while pang is (often|pluralized) paroxysm of extreme physical pain or anguish; sudden and transitory agony;throe.

As a verb pang is

to torment; to torture; to cause to have great pain or suffering.

paroxysm

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A random or sudden outburst (of activity).
  • * 1903 , (Jack London), (The Call of the Wild)
  • Unable to turn his back on the fanged danger and go on, the bull would be driven into paroxysms of rage.
  • *, chapter=23
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=The slightest effort made the patient cough. He would stand leaning on a stick and holding a hand to his side, and when the paroxysm had passed it left him shaking.}}
  • * 1955 , (Vladimir Nabokov), (Lolita)
  • Ā«There, on the soft sand, a few feet away from our elders, we would sprawl all morning, in a petrified paroxysm of desire, and take advantage of every blessed quirk in space and time to touch each otherĀ»
  • * 1983 , (John Fowles), Mantissa
  • Indeed in his excitement at this breakthrough he inadvertently dug his nails into the nurse's bottom, a gesture she misinterpreted, so that he had to suffer a paroxysm of breasts and loins in response.
  • An explosive event during a volcanic eruption.
  • A sudden recurrence of a disease.
  • Derived terms

    * paroxysmal

    pang

    English

    (Webster 1913)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (often, pluralized) paroxysm of extreme physical pain or anguish; sudden and transitory agony; throe
  • * 1591 , , Henry VI, Part II , act 3, sc. 3,
  • See, how the pangs of death do make him grin!
  • * 1888 , , "The Nightingale and the Rose" in The Happy Prince and Other Tales ,
  • So the Nightingale pressed closer against the thorn, and the thorn touched her heart, and a fierce pang of pain shot through her.
  • (often, pluralized) A sharp, sudden feeling of a mental or emotional nature, as of joy or sorrow
  • * 1867 , , The Guardian Angel , ch. 7,
  • He was startled with a piece of information which gave him such an exquisite pang of delight that he could hardly keep the usual quiet of his demeanor.

    Verb

  • to torment; to torture; to cause to have great pain or suffering
  • * 1918 , , "On Unanswering Letters" in Mince Pie ,
  • It panged him so to say good-bye when he had to leave.