Tales vs Parable - What's the difference?

tales | parable |


As verbs the difference between tales and parable

is that tales is while parable is to represent by parable.

As a noun parable is

a short narrative illustrating a lesson (usually religious/moral) by comparison or analogy.

As an adjective parable is

(obsolete) that can easily be prepared or procured; obtainable.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

tales

English

Etymology 1

See tale

Noun

(head)
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) plural of

    Noun

    (tales)
  • (legal) A person available to fill vacancies in a jury.
  • (legal) A book or register of people available to fill jury vacancies.
  • (legal) A writ to summon people to court to fill vacancies in a jury.
  • Derived terms
    * tales book * talesman

    Anagrams

    * English heteronyms ----

    parable

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (=modern) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A short narrative illustrating a lesson (usually religious/moral) by comparison or analogy
  • ''In the New Testament the parables told by Jesus convey His message, as in "The parable of the prodigal son"
    ''Catholic sermons normally draw on at least one Biblical lecture, often parables .

    See also

    * fable * allegory * pericope * simile

    Verb

    (parabl)
  • To represent by parable.
  • Which by the ancient sages was thus parabled . — Milton.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) That can easily be prepared or procured; obtainable.
  • *, vol.1, New York Review of Books, 2001, p.306:
  • The most parable and easy, and about which many are employed, is to teach a school, turn lecturer or curate [...].
    (Sir Thomas Browne)

    Anagrams

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