Coat vs Pant - What's the difference?

coat | pant |


As nouns the difference between coat and pant

is that coat is (lb) an outer garment covering the upper torso and arms while pant is a quick breathing; a catching of the breath; a gasp or pant can be (fashion) a pair of pants (trousers or underpants) or pant can be a public drinking fountain in scotland and north-east england.

As verbs the difference between coat and pant

is that coat is to cover with a coat of some material while pant is (ambitransitive) to breathe quickly or in a labored manner, as after exertion or from eagerness or excitement; to respire with heaving of the breast; to gasp.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

coat

English

Alternative forms

* (l) (obsolete)

Noun

  • (lb) An outer garment covering the upper torso and arms.
  • *
  • *:It was April 22, 1831, and a young man was walking down Whitehall in the direction of Parliament Street. He wore shepherd's plaid trousers and the swallow-tail coat of the day, with a figured muslin cravat wound about his wide-spread collar.
  • *
  • *:Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days.Frills, ruffles, flounces, lace, complicated seams and gores: not only did they sweep the ground and have to be held up in one hand elegantly as you walked along, but they had little capes or coats or feather boas.
  • (lb) A covering of material, such as paint.(w)
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:Fruit of all kinds, in coat / Rough or smooth rined, or bearded husk, or shell.
  • (lb) The fur or feathers covering an animal's skin.
  • :
  • Canvas painted with thick tar and secured round a mast or bowsprit to prevent water running down the sides into the hold (now made of rubber or leather).
  • (lb) A petticoat.
  • *(John Locke) (1632-1705)
  • *:a child in coats
  • The habit or vesture of an order of men, indicating the order or office; cloth.
  • *(Jonathan Swift) (1667–1745)
  • *:Men of his coat should be minding their prayers.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:She was sought by spirits of richest coat .
  • A coat of arms.(w)
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:Hark, countrymen! either renew the fight, / Or tear the lions out of England's coat .
  • A coat card.
  • *(Philip Massinger) (1583-1640)
  • *:Here's a trick of discarded cards of us! We were ranked with coats as long as old master lived.
  • Derived terms

    * buffy coat * coat of arms * greatcoat * covert-coat * overcoat

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cover with a coat of some material
  • One can buy coated frying pans, which are much easier to wash up than normal ones.
  • To cover as a coat.
  • Anagrams

    * * * * 1000 English basic words

    pant

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), whence also English dialectal (m). Possibly from (etyl) (m), a byform or of (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A quick breathing; a catching of the breath; a gasp.
  • (obsolete) A violent palpitation of the heart.
  • (Shakespeare)
    References
    * *

    Verb

  • (ambitransitive) To breathe quickly or in a labored manner, as after exertion or from eagerness or excitement; to respire with heaving of the breast; to gasp.
  • * Dryden
  • Pluto plants for breath from out his cell.
  • * Shelley
  • There is a cavern where my spirit / Was panted forth in anguish.
    {{quote-Fanny Hill, part=2 , Charles had just slipp'd the bolt of the door, and running, caught me in his arms, and lifting me from the ground, with his lips glew'd to mine, bore me, trembling, panting , dying, with soft fears and tender wishes, to the bed}}
  • To long for (something); to be eager for (something).
  • * Herbert
  • Then shall our hearts pant thee.
  • To long eagerly; to desire earnestly.
  • * Bible, Psalms xlii. 1
  • As the hart panteth after the water brooks.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Who pants for glory finds but short repose.
  • Of the heart, to beat with unnatural violence or rapidity; to palpitate.
  • (Spenser)
  • To sigh; to flutter; to languish.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • The whispering breeze / Pants on the leaves, and dies upon the trees.
    Synonyms
    * (breathe quickly or in a labored manner) gasp * (long for) crave, desire, long for, pine for * (long eagerly) crave, desire, long, pine * palpitate, pound, throb

    Etymology 2

    From pants

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (fashion) A pair of pants (trousers or underpants).
  • (used attributively as a modifier) Of or relating to pants.
  • Pant leg
    Derived terms
    * pant cuff * pant leg * pantsuit, pant suit * panty, panties

    Etymology 3

    Unknown

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a public drinking fountain in Scotland and North-East England
  • References

    * PMSA page with several examples * OED 2nd edition