Rack vs Pallet - What's the difference?

rack | pallet |


As nouns the difference between rack and pallet

is that rack is dress, skirt while pallet is a portable platform, usually designed to be easily moved by a forklift, on which goods can be stacked, for transport or storage or pallet can be a straw bed or pallet can be (heraldiccharge) a narrow vertical strip or pallet can be (painting).

rack

English

(wikipedia rack)

Etymology 1

See Dutch rekken

Noun

(en noun)
  • A series of one or more shelves, stacked one above the other
  • Any of various kinds of frame for holding clothes, bottles, animal fodder, mined ore, shot on a vessel, etc.
  • (nautical) A piece or frame of wood, having several sheaves, through which the running rigging passes; called also rack block.
  • A distaff.
  • A bar with teeth]] on its face or edge, to work with those of a gearwheel, [[pinion#Etymology 2, pinion, or worm, which is to drive or be driven by it.
  • A bar with teeth on its face or edge, to work with a pawl as a ratchet allowing movement in one direction only, used for example in a handbrake or crossbow.
  • A device, incorporating a ratchet, used to torture victims by stretching them beyond their natural limits.
  • * Macaulay
  • During the troubles of the fifteenth century, a rack was introduced into the Tower, and was occasionally used under the plea of political necessity.
  • A cranequin, a mechanism including a rack, pinion and pawl, providing both mechanical advantage and a ratchet, used to bend and a crossbow.
  • A pair of antlers (as on deer, moose or elk).
  • A cut of meat involving several adjacent ribs.
  • I bought a rack of lamb at the butcher's yesterday.
  • (billiards, snooker, pool) A hollow triangle used for aligning the balls at the start of a game.
  • See [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rack_%28billiards%29]
  • (slang) A woman's breasts.
  • (climbing, caving) A friction device for abseiling, consisting of a frame with 5 or more metal bars, around which the rope is threaded. Also rappel rack'', ''abseil rack .
  • (climbing, slang) A climber's set of equipment for setting up protection and belays, consisting of runners, slings, karabiners, nuts, Friends, etc.
  • I used almost a full rack on the second pitch.
  • A grate on which bacon is laid.
  • (obsolete) That which is extorted; exaction.
  • Derived terms
    * autorack * bike rack * cheese rack/cheese-rack * gun rack * spice rack * roof rack * toast rack

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To place in or hang on a rack.
  • To torture (someone) on the rack.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • He was racked and miserably tormented.
  • * 2011 , Thomas Penn, Winter King , Penguin 2012, p. 228:
  • As the poet Sir Thomas Wyatt later recalled, his father, Henry VII's jewel-house keeper Henry Wyatt, had been racked on the orders of Richard III, who had sat there and watched.
  • To cause (someone) to suffer pain.
  • * Milton
  • Vaunting aloud but racked with deep despair.
  • (figurative) To stretch or strain; to harass, or oppress by extortion.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Try what my credit can in Venice do; / That shall be racked even to the uttermost.
  • * Spenser
  • The landlords there shamefully rack their tenants.
  • * Fuller
  • They rack a Scripture simile beyond the true intent thereof.
  • (billiards, snooker, pool) To put the balls into the triangular rack and set them in place on the table.
  • (slang) To strike a male in the groin with the knee.
  • To (manually) load (a round of ammunition) from the magazine or belt into firing position in an automatic or semiautomatic firearm.
  • (mining) To wash (metals, ore, etc.) on a rack.
  • (nautical) To bind together, as two ropes, with cross turns of yarn, marline, etc.
  • Etymology 2

    (etyl)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • stretch joints of a person
  • Derived terms
    * rack one's brain

    Etymology 3

    Probably from (etyl)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To fly, as vapour or broken clouds
  • Noun

    (-)
  • Thin, flying, broken clouds, or any portion of floating vapour in the sky.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • * Francis Bacon
  • The winds in the upper region, which move the clouds above, which we call the rack , pass without noise.
  • * Charles Kingsley
  • And the night rack came rolling up.

    Etymology 4

    (etyl) rakken

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (brewing) To clarify, and thereby deter further fermentation of, beer, wine or cider by draining or siphoning it from the dregs.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • It is in common practice to draw wine or beer from the lees (which we call racking ), whereby it will clarify much the sooner.

    Etymology 5

    See , or rock (verb).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (of a horse) To amble fast, causing a rocking or swaying motion of the body; to pace.
  • (Fuller)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A fast amble.
  • Etymology 6

    See wreck.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A wreck; destruction.
  • * Samuel Pepys
  • All goes to rack .
    Derived terms
    * rack and ruin

    References

    Anagrams

    *

    pallet

    English

    (wikipedia pallet)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) palet, from (etyl) palete, from (etyl) pallr

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a portable platform, usually designed to be easily moved by a forklift, on which goods can be stacked, for transport or storage.
  • (military) A flat base for combining stores or carrying a single item to form a unit load for handling, transportation, and storage by materials handling equipmentJoint Publication 1-02 U.S. Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms; 12 April 2001 (As Amended Through 14 April 2006). .
  • (military) (DOD only) 463L pallet – An 88” x 108” aluminum flat base used to facilitate the upload and download of aircraft.
  • Derived terms
    * palletizer

    Etymology 2

    From the (etyl) paillet, from (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A straw bed.
  • (By extension from above) A makeshift bed.
  • Etymology 3

    (etyl) palla: to cut; hence a strip of cloth. The diminutive of the pale.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (heraldiccharge) A narrow vertical strip.
  • Etymology 4

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (painting)
  • * (Robert Southey)
  • The Old Dragon fled when the wonder he spied, / And cursed his own fruitless endeavor; / While the Painter call'd after his rage to deride, / Shook his pallet and brushes in triumph, and cried, / "I'll paint thee more ugly than ever!"
  • * 1860 , Chambers's Information for the People (volume 1, page 203)
  • For example, let a painter's pallet be suspended from the thumb-hole, as in the figure
  • A wooden implement, often oval or round, used by potters, crucible makers, etc., for forming, beating, and rounding their works.
  • A potter's wheel.
  • (gilding) An instrument used to take up gold leaf from the pillow, and to apply it.
  • (gilding) A tool for gilding the backs of books over the bands.
  • (brickmaking) A board on which a newly moulded brick is conveyed to the hack.
  • (Knight)
  • (engineering) A click or pawl for driving a ratchet wheel.
  • (engineering) One of the series of disks or pistons in the chain pump.
  • (Knight)
  • (horology) One of the pieces or levers connected with the pendulum of a clock, or the balance of a watch, which receive the immediate impulse of the scape-wheel, or balance wheel.
  • (music) In the organ, a valve between the wind chest and the mouth of a pipe or row of pipes.
  • (zoology) One of a pair of shelly plates that protect the siphon tubes of certain bivalves, such as the .
  • A cup containing three ounces, formerly used by surgeons.
  • (Webster 1913)

    References

    * The Oxford English Dictionary , 2nd edition, Oxford University Press * Notes: