Litter vs Pallet - What's the difference?

litter | pallet | Synonyms |

Litter is a synonym of pallet.


As nouns the difference between litter and pallet

is that litter is (countable) a platform mounted on two shafts, or a more elaborate construction, designed to be carried by two (or more) people to transport one (in luxury models sometimes more) third person(s) or (occasionally in the elaborate version) a cargo, such as a religious idol while pallet is a portable platform, usually designed to be easily moved by a forklift, on which goods can be stacked, for transport or storage or pallet can be a straw bed or pallet can be (heraldiccharge) a narrow vertical strip or pallet can be (painting).

As a verb litter

is to drop or throw trash without properly disposing of it (as discarding in public areas rather than trash receptacles).

litter

English

Noun

(wikipedia litter)
  • (countable) A platform mounted on two shafts, or a more elaborate construction, designed to be carried by two (or more) people to transport one (in luxury models sometimes more) third person(s) or (occasionally in the elaborate version) a cargo, such as a religious idol.
  • * Shakespeare
  • There is a litter ready; lay him in 't.
  • (countable) The offspring of a mammal born in one birth.
  • * D. Estrange
  • A wolf came to a sow, and very kindly offered to take care of her litter .
  • (uncountable) Material used as bedding for animals.
  • (uncountable) Collectively, items discarded on the ground.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • Strephon / Stole in, and took a strict survey / Of all the litter as it lay.
  • (uncountable) Absorbent material used in an animal's litter tray
  • (uncountable) Layer of fallen leaves and similar organic matter in a forest floor.
  • A covering of straw for plants.
  • * Evelyn
  • Take off the litter from your kernel beds.

    Synonyms

    * (platform designed to carry a person or a load): palanquin, sedan chair, stretcher, cacolet * (items discarded on the ground): waste, rubbish, garbage (US), trash (US), junk

    Derived terms

    * cat litter * litter bin * litter bug, litterbug * litter frog

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To drop or throw trash without properly disposing of it (as discarding in public areas rather than trash receptacles).
  • * By tossing the bottle out the window, he was littering .
  • To strew with scattered articles.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • the room with volumes littered round
  • To give birth to, used of animals.
  • * Sir Thomas Browne
  • We might conceive that dogs were created blind, because we observe they were littered so with us.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The son that she did litter here, / A freckled whelp hagborn.
  • To produce a litter of young.
  • * Macaulay
  • A desert where the she-wolf still littered .
  • To supply (cattle etc.) with litter; to cover with litter, as the floor of a stall.
  • * Bishop Hacke
  • Tell them how they litter their jades.
  • * Dryden
  • For his ease, well littered was the floor.
  • To be supplied with litter as bedding; to sleep or make one's bed in litter.
  • * Habington
  • The inn where he and his horse littered .

    Derived terms

    * litterer

    Anagrams

    * ---- ==Jèrriais==

    Verb

    (roa-jer-verb)
  • to wrestle
  • Derived terms

    *

    pallet

    English

    (wikipedia pallet)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) palet, from (etyl) palete, from (etyl) pallr

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a portable platform, usually designed to be easily moved by a forklift, on which goods can be stacked, for transport or storage.
  • (military) A flat base for combining stores or carrying a single item to form a unit load for handling, transportation, and storage by materials handling equipmentJoint Publication 1-02 U.S. Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms; 12 April 2001 (As Amended Through 14 April 2006). .
  • (military) (DOD only) 463L pallet – An 88” x 108” aluminum flat base used to facilitate the upload and download of aircraft.
  • Derived terms
    * palletizer

    Etymology 2

    From the (etyl) paillet, from (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A straw bed.
  • (By extension from above) A makeshift bed.
  • Etymology 3

    (etyl) palla: to cut; hence a strip of cloth. The diminutive of the pale.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (heraldiccharge) A narrow vertical strip.
  • Etymology 4

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (painting)
  • * (Robert Southey)
  • The Old Dragon fled when the wonder he spied, / And cursed his own fruitless endeavor; / While the Painter call'd after his rage to deride, / Shook his pallet and brushes in triumph, and cried, / "I'll paint thee more ugly than ever!"
  • * 1860 , Chambers's Information for the People (volume 1, page 203)
  • For example, let a painter's pallet be suspended from the thumb-hole, as in the figure
  • A wooden implement, often oval or round, used by potters, crucible makers, etc., for forming, beating, and rounding their works.
  • A potter's wheel.
  • (gilding) An instrument used to take up gold leaf from the pillow, and to apply it.
  • (gilding) A tool for gilding the backs of books over the bands.
  • (brickmaking) A board on which a newly moulded brick is conveyed to the hack.
  • (Knight)
  • (engineering) A click or pawl for driving a ratchet wheel.
  • (engineering) One of the series of disks or pistons in the chain pump.
  • (Knight)
  • (horology) One of the pieces or levers connected with the pendulum of a clock, or the balance of a watch, which receive the immediate impulse of the scape-wheel, or balance wheel.
  • (music) In the organ, a valve between the wind chest and the mouth of a pipe or row of pipes.
  • (zoology) One of a pair of shelly plates that protect the siphon tubes of certain bivalves, such as the .
  • A cup containing three ounces, formerly used by surgeons.
  • (Webster 1913)

    References

    * The Oxford English Dictionary , 2nd edition, Oxford University Press * Notes: