Faired vs Paired - What's the difference?

faired | paired |


As verbs the difference between faired and paired

is that faired is (fair) while paired is (pair).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

faired

English

Verb

(head)
  • (fair)
  • Anagrams

    *

    fair

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) fayr, feir, fager, from (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Beautiful, of a pleasing appearance, with a pure and fresh quality.
  • :
  • :
  • *{{quote-book, year=1917, year_published=2008
  • , edition=HTML, author=(Edgar Rice Burroughs), publisher=The Gutenberg Project , title= A Princess of Mars , passage="It was a purely scientific research party sent out by my father's father, the Jeddak of Helium, to rechart the air currents, and to take atmospheric density tests," replied the fair prisoner, in a low, well-modulated voice.}}
  • *{{quote-book, year=2010, author=(Stephan Grundy)
  • , title= Beowulf , genre=Fiction, publisher=iUniverse, isbn=9781440156977, page=33 , passage=And yet he was also, though many generations separated them, distant cousin to the shining eoten-main Geard, whom the god Frea Ing had seen from afar and wedded; and to Scatha, the fair daughter of the old thurse Theasa, who had claimed a husband from among the gods as weregild for her father's slaying: often, it was said, the ugliest eotens would sire the fairest maids.}}
  • Unblemished (figuratively or literally); clean and pure; innocent.
  • :
  • :
  • *Book of Common Prayer
  • *:a fair white linen cloth
  • Light in color, pale, particularly as regards skin tone but also referring to blond hair.
  • :
  • *1677 , (Matthew Hale), The Primitive Origination of Mankind, Considered and Examined According to the Light of Nature , page 200
  • *:the northern people large and fair -complexioned
  • *
  • *:This new-comer was a man who in any company would have seemed striking. In complexion fair , and with blue or gray eyes, he was tall as any Viking, as broad in the shoulder.
  • Just, equitable.
  • :
  • *
  • *:“[…] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons ! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
  • Adequate, reasonable, or decent.
  • :
  • *, chapter=3
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=My hopes wa'n't disappointed. I never saw clams thicker than they was along them inshore flats. I filled my dreener in no time, and then it come to me that 'twouldn't be a bad idee to get a lot more, take 'em with me to Wellmouth, and peddle 'em out. Clams was fairly scarce over that side of the bay and ought to fetch a fair price.}}
  • Favorable to a ship's course.
  • Not overcast; cloudless; clear; pleasant; propitious; said of the sky, weather, or wind, etc.
  • :
  • *(Matthew Prior) (1664-1721)
  • *:You wish fair winds may waft him over.
  • Free from obstacles or hindrances; unobstructed; unencumbered; open; direct; said of a road, passage, etc.
  • :
  • *Sir (Walter Raleigh) (ca.1554-1618)
  • *:The caliphs obtained a mighty empire, which was in a fair way to have enlarged.
  • (lb) Without sudden change of direction or curvature; smooth; flowing; said of the figure of a vessel, and of surfaces, water lines, and other lines.
  • (lb) Between the baselines.
  • Synonyms
    * (beautiful) beautiful, pretty, lovely * (unblemished) pure, clean, neat * (light in color) pale * (just) honest, just, equitable
    Derived terms
    * all's fair in love and war * fair and square * fair cop * fair copy * fair go * fair play * fair sex * fair to middling * fair use * fair-weather friend * to be fair

    Noun

    (fair)
  • Something which is fair (in various senses of the adjective).
  • When will we learn to distinguish between the fair and the foul?
  • (obsolete) A woman, a member of the ‘fair sex’; also as a collective singular, women.
  • * 1744 , , act 2, scene 8
  • ''Love and Hymen, hand in hand,
    ''Come, restore the nuptial band!
    ''And sincere delights prepare
    ''To crown the hero and the fair .
  • * 1749 , Henry Fielding, Tom Jones , Folio Society 1973, p. 39:
  • In enjoying, therefore, such place of rendezvous, the British fair ought to esteem themselves more happy than any of their foreign sisters
  • * 1819 , Lord Byron, Don Juan , III.24:
  • If single, probably his plighted Fair / Has in his absence wedded some rich miser [...].
  • (obsolete) Fairness, beauty.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • A fair woman; a sweetheart.
  • * Shenstone
  • I have found out a gift for my fair .
  • (obsolete) Good fortune; good luck.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Now fair befall thee!

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To smoothen or even a surface (especially a connection or junction on a surface).
  • To bring into perfect alignment (especially about rivet holes when connecting structural members).
  • To construct or design a structure whose primary function is to produce a smooth outline or reduce air drag or water resistance.
  • (obsolete) To make fair or beautiful.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Fairing the foul.
    Synonyms
    * (to reduce air drag or water resistance) to streamline
    Derived terms
    * fair off * fair up * fairing

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Clearly; openly; frankly; civilly; honestly; favorably; auspiciously; agreeably.
  • Derived terms
    * bid fair * fair and square

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) feire, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A community gathering to celebrate and exhibit local achievements.
  • An event for public entertainment and trade, a market.
  • * , chapter=7
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=The turmoil went on—no rest, no peace. […] It was nearly eleven o'clock now, and he strolled out again. In the little fair created by the costers' barrows the evening only seemed beginning; and the naphtha flares made one's eyes ache, the men's voices grated harshly, and the girls' faces saddened one.}}
  • An event for professionals in a trade to learn of new products and do business.
  • A funfair, an amusement park.
  • Derived terms
    * funfair

    Statistics

    * ----

    paired

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (pair)
  • Anagrams

    *

    pair

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) paire, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • Two similar or identical things taken together; often followed by of.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-14, author=(Jonathan Freedland)
  • , volume=189, issue=1, page=18, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Obama's once hip brand is now tainted , passage=Where we once sent love letters in a sealed envelope, or stuck photographs of our children in a family album, now such private material is despatched to servers and clouds operated by people we don't know and will never meet. Perhaps we assume that our name, address and search preferences will be viewed by some unseen pair of corporate eyes, probably not human, and don't mind that much.}}
  • Two people in a relationship, partnership (especially sexual) or friendship.
  • Used with binary nouns (often in the plural to indicate multiple instances, since such nouns are plurale tantum)
  • A couple of working animals attached to work together, as by a yoke.
  • (cards) A poker hand that contains of two cards of identical rank, which cannot also count as a better hand.
  • (cricket) A score of zero runs (a duck) in both innings of a two-innings match
  • (baseball, informal) A double play, two outs recorded in one play
  • (baseball, informal) A doubleheader, two games played on the same day between the same teams
  • (slang) A pair of breasts
  • (Australia, politics) The exclusion of one member of a parliamentary party from a vote, if a member of the other party is absent for important personal reasons.
  • Two members of opposite parties or opinion, as in a parliamentary body, who mutually agree not to vote on a given question, or on issues of a party nature during a specified time.
  • There were two pairs on the final vote.
  • (archaic) A number of things resembling one another, or belonging together; a set.
  • * Charles Dickens
  • plunging myself into poverty and shabbiness and love in one room up three pair of stairs
  • * Beaumont and Fletcher
  • Two crowns in my pocket, two pair of cards.
  • (kinematics) In a mechanism, two elements, or bodies, which are so applied to each other as to mutually constrain relative motion; named in accordance with the motion it permits, as in turning pair'', ''sliding pair'', ''twisting pair .
  • Synonyms
    * two objects in a group: duo, dyad, couple, brace, twosome, duplet * (pair of breasts) See also
    Derived terms
    * on a pair * grow a pair * in pairs * king pair * pair-horse * pair-oar(ed) * pair production * pair skating * royal pair * strap on a pair

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To group into sets of two.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Glossy jet is paired with shining white.
    The wedding guests were paired boy/girl and groom's party/bride's party.
  • To bring two (animals, notably dogs) together for mating.
  • (politics, slang) To engage (oneself) with another of opposite opinions not to vote on a particular question or class of questions.
  • To suit; to fit, as a counterpart.
  • * Rowe
  • My heart was made to fit and pair with thine.
    (Webster 1913)
  • (computing) to form wireless connection between to devices
  • *{{quote-web
  • , date = yyyy-mm-dd , author =Microsoft , title = How-to: Keyboards , site = http://www.microsoft.com , url = http://www.microsoft.com/hardware/en-us/help/support/how-to/keyboard/bluetooth , accessdate = 2015-02-21 }}
    If your computer has a built-in, non-Microsoft transceiver, you can pair the device directly to the computer by using your computer’s Bluetooth software configuration program but without using the Microsoft Bluetooth transceiver.
    Derived terms
    * pairing * pair off * pair up

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To impair.
  • (Spenser)

    Anagrams

    * 1000 English basic words ----