Main vs Page - What's the difference?

main | page |


As a noun main

is .

As a proper noun page is

for someone who was a servant.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

main

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), (m), (m), partly from (etyl) . More at (may).

Adjective

(-)
  • (label) Great in size or degree; vast; strong; powerful; important.
  • * (Samuel Daniel) (1562-1619)
  • Principal; prime; chief; leading; of chief or principal importance.
  • * (John Tillotson) (1630-1694)
  • * , chapter=7
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=With some of it on the south and more of it on the north of the great main thoroughfare that connects Aldgate and the East India Docks, St. Bede's at this period of its history was perhaps the poorest and most miserable parish in the East End of London.}}
  • *{{quote-book, year=1935, author= George Goodchild
  • , title=Death on the Centre Court, chapter=5 , passage=By one o'clock the place was choc-a-bloc. […] The restaurant was packed, and the promenade between the two main courts and the subsidiary courts was thronged with healthy-looking youngish people, drawn to the Mecca of tennis from all parts of the country.}}
  • Principal or chief in size or extent; largest; consisting of the largest part; most important by reason or size or strength.
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Yesterday’s fuel , passage=The dawn of the oil age was fairly recent. Although the stuff was used to waterproof boats in the Middle East 6,000 years ago, extracting it in earnest began only in 1859 after an oil strike in Pennsylvania.
  • Full; undivided; sheer (of strength, force etc.).
  • * 1817 , (Walter Scott), , XII:
  • (label) Belonging to or connected with the principal mast in a vessel.
  • (label) Big; angry.
  • Derived terms
    * main drag * main road

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Very; very much; greatly; mightily; extremely; exceedingly.
  • * 1799 , Samuel Foote, The works of Samuel Foote :
  • * 1840 , Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Leigh Hunt, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The dramatic works of Richard Brinsley Sheridan :
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) , later also taking senses from the adjective.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • * Spenser
  • That which is chief or principal; the chief or main portion; the gross; the bulk; the greater part.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • * 1858 , Humphrey Prideaux, James Talboys Wheeler, An historical connection of the Old and New Testaments :
  • * Francis Bacon
  • * 1624 , John Smith, Generall Historie , in Kupperman 1988, page 90:
  • * 1624 , John Donne, Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, and severall steps in my Sicknes (Meditation XVII):
  • * 1851 , Herman Melville, Moby-Dick :
  • * Dryden
  • A large pipe or cable providing utility service to a building or area, such as water main or electric main.
  • (label) The mainsail.
  • Derived terms
    {{der3, (large pipe or cable) gas main, mains (qualifier), water main , in the main , main brace , main drag , maincrop , mainframe , mainland , mainline, main line , mainmast , mainplane , mainsail , mainsheet , mainspring , mainstreet, main street , maintop , maintopmast}}

    Etymology 3

    ; compare (manual).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A hand or match in a game of dice.
  • (Prior)
    (Thackeray)
  • A stake played for at dice.
  • * Shakespeare, The First Park of King Henry IV
  • The largest throw in a match at dice; a throw at dice within given limits, as in the game of hazard.
  • A match at cockfighting.
  • * Thackeray
  • A main-hamper, or fruit basket.
  • (Ainsworth)

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    *

    page

    English

    (wikipedia page)

    Etymology 1

    Via (etyl) from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One of the many pieces of paper bound together within a book or similar document.
  • * (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow) (1807-1882)
  • Such was the book from whose pages she sang.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=September-October, author=(Henry Petroski)
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= The Evolution of Eyeglasses , passage=The ability of a segment of a glass sphere to magnify whatever is placed before it was known around the year 1000, when the spherical segment was called a reading stone,
  • One side of a paper leaf on which one has written or printed.
  • A figurative record or writing; a collective memory.
  • (label) The type set up for printing a page.
  • (label) A web page.
  • (label) A block of contiguous memory of a fixed length.
  • Synonyms
    * (side of a leaf) side * account, record
    Derived terms
    (Terms derived from "page") * on the same page * page in, page out * page-turner *

    Verb

    (pag)
  • To mark or number the pages of, as a book or manuscript.
  • To turn several pages of a publication.
  • The patient paged through magazines while he waited for the doctor.
  • To furnish with folios.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), possibly via (etyl) (m), from , in sense of "boy from the rural regions". Used in English from the 13th century onwards.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A serving boy – a youth attending a person of high degree, especially at courts, as a position of honor and education.
  • (British) A youth employed for doing errands, waiting on the door, and similar service in households.
  • (US) A boy employed to wait upon the members of a legislative body.
  • (in libraries) The common name given to an employee whose main purpose is to replace materials that have either been checked out or otherwise moved, back to their shelves.
  • A boy child.
  • * 1380+ , (Geoffrey Chaucer), (The Canterbury Tales)
  • A doghter hadde they bitwixe]] hem two / Of twenty yeer, with-outen any mo, / Savinge a child that was of half-yeer age; / In [[cradle, cradel it lay and was a propre page .
  • A contrivance, as a band, pin, snap, or the like, to hold the skirt of a woman’s dress from the ground.
  • A track along which pallets carrying newly molded bricks are conveyed to the hack.
  • Any one of several species of colorful South American moths of the genus Urania .
  • Synonyms
    * (serving boy) page boy * (boy child) boy

    Verb

    (pag)
  • To attend (someone) as a page.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • To call or summon (someone).
  • To contact (someone) by means of a pager.
  • I’ll be out all day, so page me if you need me.
  • To call (somebody) using a public address system so as to find them.
  • An SUV parked me in. Could you please page its owner?

    Anagrams

    * (l) 1000 English basic words ----