Budge vs Paddle - What's the difference?

budge | paddle | Related terms |

Budge is a related term of paddle.


In lang=en terms the difference between budge and paddle

is that budge is to move while paddle is to spank with a paddle.

As verbs the difference between budge and paddle

is that budge is to move while paddle is to propel something through water with a paddle, oar, hands, etc or paddle can be (british) to walk or dabble playfully in shallow water, especially at the seaside.

As nouns the difference between budge and paddle

is that budge is a kind of fur prepared from lambskin dressed with the wool on, formerly used as an edging and ornament, especially on scholastic habits while paddle is a two-handed, single-bladed oar used to propel a canoe or a small boat.

As an adjective budge

is (obsolete) brisk; stirring; jocund or budge can be (obsolete) austere or stiff, like scholastics.

budge

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) bouger.

Alternative forms

* budg (obsolete)

Verb

(budg)
  • To move.
  • I’ve been pushing this rock as hard as I can, but it won’t budge an inch.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll not budge an inch, boy.
  • * 2014 , Jacob Steinberg, " Wigan shock Manchester City in FA Cup again to reach semi-finals", The Guardian , 9 March 2014:
  • Yet goals in either half from Jordi Gómez and James Perch inspired them and then, in the face of a relentless City onslaught, they simply would not budge , throwing heart, body and soul in the way of a ball which seemed destined for their net on several occasions.
  • To move.
  • I’ve been pushing this rock as hard as I can, but I can’t budge it.
  • To yield in one’s opinions or beliefs.
  • The Minister for Finance refused to budge on the new economic rules.
  • To try to improve the spot of a decision on a sports field.
  • Derived terms
    * budge up * budger
    Synonyms
    * shift

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Brisk; stirring; jocund.
  • (South)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • A kind of fur prepared from lambskin dressed with the wool on, formerly used as an edging and ornament, especially on scholastic habits.
  • * Milton
  • They are become so liberal, as to part freely with their own budge -gowns from off their backs.

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (obsolete) austere or stiff, like scholastics
  • * Milton
  • Those budge doctors of the stoic fur.
    Derived terms
    * budge bachelor * budge barrel (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    *

    paddle

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) padell (1407, "small spade"), from Medieval Latin padela, perhaps from (etyl) patella "pan, plate", the diminutive of patina

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A two-handed, single-bladed oar used to propel a canoe or a small boat.
  • A double-bladed oar used for kayaking.
  • Time spent on paddling.
  • We had a nice paddle this morning.
  • A slat of a paddleboat's wheel.
  • A paddlewheel.
  • A blade of a waterwheel.
  • (video games, dated) A game controller with a round wheel used to control player movement along one axis of the video screen.
  • (British) A meandering walk or dabble through shallow water, especially at the seaside.
  • A kitchen utensil shaped like a paddle and used for mixing, beating etc.
  • A bat-shaped spanking implement
  • ''The paddle practically ousted the British cane as the spanker's attribute in the independent US
  • A ping-pong bat.
  • A flat limb of an aquatic animal, adapted for swimming.
  • ''A sea turtle's paddles make it swim almost as fast as land tortoises are slow
  • In a sluice, a panel that controls the flow of water.
  • A group of inerts
  • A handheld defibrillation/cardioversion electrode
  • Derived terms
    * paddler * paddleboat * paddle board * paddlewheel * paddle steamer * paddling * dog paddle * traffic paddle
    See also
    * oar

    Verb

  • To propel something through water with a paddle, oar, hands, etc.
  • * L'Estrange
  • as the men were paddling for their lives
  • * (John Gay)
  • while paddling ducks the standing lake desire
  • * 1884 : (Mark Twain), (The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn), Chapter IX
  • Daytimes we paddled all over the island in the canoe
  • To row a boat with less than one's full capacity.
  • To spank with a paddle.
  • To pat or stroke amorously or gently.
  • * Shakespeare
  • to be paddling palms and pinching fingers.
  • To tread upon; to trample.
  • Etymology 2

    Recorded since 1530, probably cognate with Low German paddeln "to tramp about," frequent. of padjen "to tramp, to run in short steps," from pad (also in Dutch dialects)

    Verb

  • (British) To walk or dabble playfully in shallow water, especially at the seaside.
  • To toddle
  • (archaic) To toy or caress using hands or fingers