Overweening vs Overween - What's the difference?

overweening | overween |


As verbs the difference between overweening and overween

is that overweening is while overween is (ergative) to think too highly or arrogantly of (oneself).

As an adjective overweening

is unduly confident; arrogant; presumptuous; conceited.

As a noun overweening

is an excessively high opinion of oneself or one's abilities; presumption, arrogance.

overweening

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Unduly confident; arrogant; presumptuous; conceited.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Here's an overweening rogue.
    She wins one modeling contest in Montana and suddenly she's overweening .
  • *1870 ,
  • *:No success rendered him overweening and no disaster was ever known to stagger his firmness.
  • *1908 , Frederic Bancroft and William A. Dunning,
  • *:The Senate was displaying an overweening hauteur as if it were the government.
  • Exaggerated, excessive
  • * {{quote-web
  • , date=20150104 , year= , first= , last= , author=Jonathan Rauch , authorlink= , title=How to Make Men Free , site=NY Times citation , archiveorg= , accessdate=21050215 , passage=The idea that an overweening federal government is a threat to both freedom and equality (not to mention prosperity) goes back to Jefferson, James Madison, Patrick Henry and some other fairly respectable personages. }}

    Derived terms

    * overweeningly * overweeningness

    Noun

    (-)
  • An excessively high opinion of oneself or one's abilities; presumption, arrogance.
  • *, II.12:
  • *:Let us suppresse this over-weening .
  • Verb

    (head)
  • overween

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (ergative) To think too highly or arrogantly of (oneself).
  • * (rfdate), Milton, Sonnet IX :
  • and they that overween , / And at thy growing virtues fret their spleen,
  • * 2005 , A. J. Liebling, published in Just Enough Liebling: Classic Work by the Legendary New Yorker Writer , page 327:
  • The clouds on Futurity Day bore out in a general way this prognostication. But he overweened himself.
  • To make or render arrogant and overweening.
  • * 1987 October, in Field & Stream , volume 92, number 6, page 24:
  • There is, I suppose, the cheap drama of man sticking his nose into an area where it does little good except to expand his already overweened vanity.
  • * 2009 , Ariel Dorfman, The Empire's Old Clothes: What the Lone Ranger, Babar, and Other Innocent Heroes Do to Our Minds , page 6:
  • Sometimes we manage to come up with original ways of viewing a world hardened, stratified, overweened by its own power, a world which believes itself as omnipotent as its technological achievements might seem to imply.
  • (proscribed) To overwhelm.
  • * 2003 , Michael Gelven, What happens to us when we think: transformation and reality , page 44:
  • The invasion of a vast enemy host upon the unprepared is unstoppable; the huge phalanx of tanks overweens our small army of trucks and rifles;

    Derived terms

    * overweening

    References

    * Webster 1913