Ornament vs Appoggiatura - What's the difference?

ornament | appoggiatura |


As nouns the difference between ornament and appoggiatura

is that ornament is (senseid) an element of decoration; that which embellishes or adorns while appoggiatura is a type of musical ornament, falling on the beat, which often creates a suspension and subtracts for itself half the time value of the principal note which follows.

As a verb ornament

is (senseid) to decorate.

ornament

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (senseid) An element of decoration; that which embellishes or adorns.
  • * Tennyson
  • Like that long-buried body of the king / Found lying with his urns and ornaments .
  • * 1919:
  • I'm a bit short on brain myself; the old bean would appear to have been constructed more for ornament than for use.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2012-03
  • , author= , title=Pixels or Perish , volume=100, issue=2, page=106 , magazine= citation , passage=Drawings and pictures are more than mere ornaments in scientific discourse. Blackboard sketches, geological maps, diagrams of molecular structure, astronomical photographs, MRI images, the many varieties of statistical charts and graphs: These pictorial devices are indispensable tools for presenting evidence, for explaining a theory, for telling a story.}}
  • # A Christmas tree decoration.
  • (music) A musical flourish that is unnecessary to the overall melodic or harmonic line, but serves to decorate or "ornament" that line.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • (senseid) To decorate.
  • We will ornament the windows with trim to make the room seem brighter.
  • (senseid) To add to.
  • The editor ornamented his plain writing, making it fancier but less clear.

    Synonyms

    *(decorate) decorate, embellish, trim

    appoggiatura

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A type of musical ornament, falling on the beat, which often creates a suspension and subtracts for itself half the time value of the principal note which follows.
  • * "The following Adagietto was like a long, melting appoggiatura composed of smaller dying falls and languid resolutions." — New York Times , March 2, 1992