Dialogue vs Oratory - What's the difference?

dialogue | oratory |


As a verb dialogue

is .

As a noun oratory is

(uncountable) the art of public speaking, especially in a formal, expressive, or forceful manner or oratory can be (countable) a private chapel.

dialogue

English

Alternative forms

* (US and computing) dialog

Noun

(en noun)
  • A conversation or other form of discourse between two or more individuals.
  • Bill and Melinda maintained a dialogue via email over the course of their long-distance relationship.
  • * 2013 , Paul Harris, Lance Armstrong faces multi-million dollar legal challenges after confession'' (in ''The Guardian , 19 January 2013)[http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2013/jan/19/lance-armstrong-legal-challenges-confession]
  • The hours of dialogue with Winfrey, which culminated in a choked-up moment on Friday night as he discussed the impact of his cheating on his family, appear to have failed to give Armstrong the redemption that he craves.
  • In a dramatic or literary presentation, the verbal parts of the script or text; the verbalizations of the actors or characters.
  • The movie had great special effects, but the dialogue was lackluster.
  • A literary form, where the presentation resembles a conversation.
  • A literary historian, she specialized in the dialogues of ancient Greek philosophers.
  • (computing) A dialogue box.
  • Once the My Computer dialogue opens, select Local Disk (C:), then right click and scroll down.

    Antonyms

    * introspection * monologue * multilogue

    Derived terms

    ( conversation or other form of discourse between two or more individuals) * dialogic * dialogical * dialogically * dialogism * dialogist * dialogistic * dialogistically * dialogize * modal dialogue

    Verb

    (dialogu)
  • (informal, business) To discuss or negotiate so that all parties can reach an understanding.
  • Pearson wanted to dialogue with his overseas counterparts about the new reporting requirements.
  • (obsolete) To take part in a dialogue; to dialogize.
  • (Shakespeare)

    oratory

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • (uncountable) The art of public speaking, especially in a formal, expressive, or forceful manner.
  • (uncountable) Eloquence; the quality of artistry and persuasiveness in speech or writing.
  • Synonyms
    * (art of public speaking) public speaking

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) oratorie, (etyl) oratoire, and their source, (etyl) .

    Noun

    (oratories)
  • (countable) A private chapel.
  • * Jeremy Taylor
  • Do not omit thy prayers for want of a good oratory , or place to pray in.
  • (countable) A large Roman Catholic church.