Optative vs Irrealis - What's the difference?

optative | irrealis |


In context|grammar|lang=en terms the difference between optative and irrealis

is that optative is (grammar) a verb or expression in the optative mood while irrealis is (grammar) of a verb: inflected to indicate that an act or state of being is not a fact.

As adjectives the difference between optative and irrealis

is that optative is expressing a wish or a choice while irrealis is (grammar) of a verb: inflected to indicate that an act or state of being is not a fact.

As a noun optative

is (grammar) a mood of verbs found in some languages (eg old prussian, ancient greek), used to express a wish english has no inflexional optative mood, but it has modal verbs like "might" and "may" that express possibility.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

optative

English

Alternative forms

*

Adjective

(-)
  • expressing a wish or a choice.
  • (Fuller)
  • (grammar) related or pertaining to the optative mood.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • (grammar) a mood of verbs found in some languages (e.g. Old Prussian, Ancient Greek), used to express a wish. English has no inflexional optative mood, but it has modal verbs like "might" and "may" that express possibility.
  • (grammar) a verb or expression in the optative mood.
  • Derived terms

    * optatively

    See also

    * subjunctive

    irrealis

    English

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (grammar) Of a verb: inflected to indicate that an act or state of being is not a fact.
  • Although the only irrealis mood in English is the subjunctive mood, some other languages include additional irrealis moods, including cohortative, jussive, speculative, and optative.

    Anagrams

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