Ooze vs Slime - What's the difference?

ooze | slime |


As nouns the difference between ooze and slime

is that ooze is potion of vegetable matter used for leather tanning or ooze can be soft mud, slime, or shells on the bottom of a body of water while slime is soft, moist earth or clay, having an adhesive quality; viscous mud; any substance of a dirty nature, that is moist, soft, and adhesive; bitumen; mud containing metallic ore, obtained in the preparatory dressing.

As verbs the difference between ooze and slime

is that ooze is to be secreted or slowly leak while slime is to coat with slime.

ooze

English

Etymology 1

* ()'' (etyl) . * ()'' (etyl) ''wosen'', from ''wose 'sap'; see above.

Noun

(en noun)
  • Potion of vegetable matter used for leather tanning.
  • Secretion, humour.
  • A thick often unpleasant liquid; muck.
  • Verb

  • To be secreted or slowly leak.
  • * 1988 , David Drake, The Sea Hag , Baen Publishing Enterprises (2003), ISBN 0671654241, unnumbered page:
  • Pale slime oozed through all the surfaces; some of it dripped from the ceiling and burned Dennis as badly as the blazing sparks had done a moment before.
  • * 1994 , Madeleine May Kunin, Living a Political Life , Vintage Books (1995), ISBN 9780679740087, unnumbered page:
  • He was hard to understand because he spoke softly, and his Vermont accent was as thick as maple syrup oozing down a pile of pancakes.
  • * 2011 , Karen Mahoney, The Iron Witch , Flux (2011), ISBN 9780738725826, page 278:
  • Her heart constricted when she saw thick blood oozing from a wide gash in his forehead.
  • (figuratively) To give off a sense of (something).
  • * 1989 , Robert R. McCammon, The Wolf's Hour , Open Road Integrated Media (2011), ISBN 9781453231548, unnumbered page:
  • "Good servants are so hard to find," Chesna said, oozing arrogance.
  • * 1999 , Tamsin Blanchard, Antonio Berardi: Sex and Sensibility , Watson-Guptill Publications (1999), ISBN 9780823012077, page 16:
  • There are no two ways about it: a Berardi dress oozes sex appeal from its very seams.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=April 21 , author=Jonathan Jurejko , title=Newcastle 3-0 Stoke , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Newcastle had failed to penetrate a typically organised Stoke backline in the opening stages but, once Cabaye and then Cisse breached their defence, Newcastle oozed confidence and controlled the game with a swagger expected of a top-four team.}}

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) wose'', from (etyl) '''' 'mud, mire', from (etyl) . More at virus.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Soft mud, slime, or shells on the bottom of a body of water.
  • * Shakespeare
  • My son i' the ooze is bedded.
  • A piece of soft, wet, pliable turf.
  • The liquor of a tanning vat.
  • English terms with multiple etymologies

    slime

    English

    Noun

  • Soft, moist earth or clay, having an adhesive quality; viscous mud; any substance of a dirty nature, that is moist, soft, and adhesive; bitumen; mud containing metallic ore, obtained in the preparatory dressing.
  • * Shakespeare
  • As it [the Nile] ebbs, the seedsman / Upon the slime and ooze scatters his grain.
  • Any mucilaginous substance; or a mucus-like substance which exudes from the bodies of certain animals, such as snails or slugs.
  • A sneaky, unethical person; a slimeball.
  • * 2005 , G. E. Nordell, Backlot Requiem: A Rick Walker Mystery
  • If this guy knows who killed Robert, the right thing to do is to tell the police. If he doesn't know, really, then he's an opportunistic slime . It's still blackmail.
  • (figuratively, obsolete) Human flesh, seen disparagingly; mere human form.
  • * , II.x:
  • th'eternall Lord in fleshly slime / Enwombed was, from wretched Adams line / To purge away the guilt of sinfull crime [...].
  • (obsolete) = ((l))
  • *
  • And they said one to another, Go to, let us make brick, and burn them thoroughly. And they had brick for stone, and slime had they for morter.

    Derived terms

    * slime mold * pink slime

    Synonyms

    * (any substance of a dirty nature) sludge

    Verb

    (slim)
  • To coat with slime.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=7 citation , passage=‘Children crawled over each other like little grey worms in the gutters,’ he said. ‘The only red things about them were their buttocks and they were raw. Their faces looked as if snails had slimed on them and their mothers were like great sick beasts whose byres had never been cleared. […]’}}
  • (figuratively) To besmirch or disparage.
  • Anagrams

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